New Head of Commercial and Retail at Go North East

first_imgGo North East has promoted Stephen King to head up its Commercial and Retail division.Stephen King: Go North East’s new Head of Commercial and RetailThe move follows Stephen success as the company’s first ever Head of Marketing – a position he took up in 2015.Says Managing Director of Go North East, Kevin Carr: “Stephen has proven himself to be a valuable asset to the company and is the best person to add vigour and innovation to our commercial strategy.”Stephen’s appointment is integral to plans to boost the commercial advantage of Go North East’s substantial ongoing investment programme, which has totalled over £50m in capital spend in the last five years, including a £10.5m investment in upgrading services in 2016.He will oversee the firm’s commercial strategy and function which comprises network design, business development, retail and marketing communications along with stakeholder engagement.Stephen, who has worked at Go North East since he was 16 and occupies a seat on its Senior Management Team, has pioneered a number of high profile retail and marketing initiatives and industry firsts in his career at the company to date.last_img read more

Slopitch Gold goes to West Kootenay Boundary

first_imgDoreen Reimer of Nelson and Mary Bermel captured silver in Flight B Cribbage while Dave and Eleanor Thomas took the Flight C silver medal.In the pool, Marylee Banyard of Nelson won three gold and one bronze in women’s 50-meter butterfly, 200 meter individual medley,  25 meter butterfly and 200 meter freestyle, respectively.June Johnston of Nelson won a pair of silver medals in women’s 70-74 200-meter individual medley and 100-meter breaststroke.The team of Wilma Turner of Castlegar, Barb Roberts of Rossland, Banyard and Joan Hooper of Christina Lake won bronze in 4 X 25-meter freestyle and medley relays while Steve Miller of Trail, Peter Lee of Nelson, Richard Mathers and Shayne Konar of Grand Forks won bronze in men’s 25-meter freestyle relay.Sharisse Kyle of Nelson won gold in 60-64 Cycling time trial.The Kootenay Rhythm Dragons won silver in the Dragon Boat Racing while the West Kootenay Boundary men’s soccer squad finished fourth overall in the 55-plus division.On the ice, Kootenay Glaciers won bronze in the men’s 55 division; Kootenay Kings took silver in men’s 60; and Glacier Kings captured bronze in men’s 65 category. All three teams had players from Rossland, Nelson, Castlegar, Trail and Cranbrook forming the rosters.West Kootenay Boundary zone finished fifth overall in the 12-zone field with 113 medals. West Kootenay/Boundary defeated Vancouver Island North 17-12 to capture the Gold Medal in Slopitch at the 2018 BC 55-Plus Senior Games Saturday in Cranbrook.The BC 55-plus Senior Games wrapped up Saturday following four days of competition in Cranbrook and Kimberley.The meeting was a rematch of a game Friday between the two clubs in Slopitch.West Kootenay/Boundary squad includes Mike Roch, Ken Haynes, Rick Lowen, Luree Gould, Lorne Wuori and Joe Capiglione of Nelson; Bob Murray of Rossland, Nona Kutcher of Castlegar, Bruce Borsato, Barry Benner and Colin McLean of Trail, Alta Pinney of Salmo, Carson Erickson, John Mota and Christine Mota of Genelle and James Ross.In other sports, the team of Sandra Edson and Patrick O’Neil won the gold medal in 301-750 master points Bridge while Doris and Peter Laktin claimed silver in 0 to 300 masters points bridge.last_img read more

Sam Houston State Retains Southland Commissioner’s Cup

first_imgCommissioner’s Cup Standings (PDF)FRISCO, Texas – Sam Houston State won team championships in baseball, men’s golf and women’s indoor and outdoor track & field on its way to claiming its second consecutive Southland Conference Commissioner’s Cup, the league office announced Sunday. McNeese State Oral Roberts In addition to its four team championships, Sam Houston got runner-up finishes from the softball and men’s indoor track & field teams. Four other teams finished third, including the men’s basketball and the outdoor track & field teams as well as football and volleyball, each of which tied for third. Six men’s teams and four women’s team had top-three finishes for the Bearkats, which finished among the top three in 10 of the league’s 17 sports. 2. 26.0 Lamar (158.5), Central Arkansas (152.5) and McNeese State (142.5), came in third, fourth and fifth place, respectively. 14. Abilene Christian 57.5 Stephen F. Austin claimed the women’s all-sports trophy on the strength of team championship in women’s soccer and a first-place tie in women’s basketball. They also were the runners up in both indoor and outdoor track & field and finished third in women’s cross country to give them 101.5 points. Central Arkansas was second with 96 points. 133.0 New Orleans Southeastern La. Pl. 8. Total 101.5 9. 10. 64.5 Final Commissioner’s Cup Standings 73.5 Northwestern State A&M-Corpus Christi SFA was only a point behind Sam Houston in the Commissioner’s Cup standings thanks to 74 points from its men’s basketball team title, runner-up finishes by the men’s cross country and outdoor track & field teams and third-place finishes by men’s indoor track & field and a third-place tie by the men’s golf squad. 64.5 Women 85.0 Men 11. 58.5 42.0 91.0 56.5 Texas A&M-Corpus Christi (133) finished sixth, edging seventh-place Northwestern State (132.5) by the slimmest of margins for its highest finish in eight seasons in the conference. Southeastern Louisiana (126) finished in eighth place, followed by Abilene Christian (106.5), which finished ninth in its first season in the league. Oral Roberts (102) was 10th followed by Nicholls (94), UIW (85), Houston Baptist (84.5) and New Orleans (48) to round out this year’s standings. 78.0 18.0 142.5 175.5 68.5 The Commissioner’s Cup is awarded annually to the top overall athletics program in the Southland. Sam Houston State has won the Cup a record five times. In the 17-year history of the Commissioner’s Cup, Stephen F. Austin has two and Northwestern State has one. 126.0 13. Nicholls 43.0 The three trophies will be presented at the annual Southland Conference Honors Dinner Tuesday night at the Westin Stonebriar Resort in Frisco, Texas. 7. 3. 49.0 1. Lamar 30.0 University 74.0 6. 52.0 Houston Baptist 74.0 132.5 158.5 85.5 106.5 77.5 94.0 96.0 The Sam Houston men had 85.5 points to claim the men’s all-sports trophy ahead of Southeastern Louisiana and Stephen F. Austin, which tied for second place with 74 points each. The Bearkats previously won the men’s all-sports trophy in 2000 and 2007. The Sam Houston women totaled 91 points but finished third in the final standings for the women’s all-sports trophy a season after claiming its first trophy. The Southland Conference all-sports trophies are awarded annually for men’s and women’s competition based on a 10-point system for all conference sports. Point values are 14, 13, 12, 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2 and 1, pending place of finish. Regular-season standings are used for sports that have a conference tournament. The Commissioner’s Cup is awarded to the university compiling the highest combined total of men’s and women’s all-sports points. 4. 47.0 55.0 5. 12. UIW 57.5 48.0 47.0 102.0 85.0 Sam Houston State Central Arkansas 83.5 Sam Houston State edged rival Stephen F. Austin by just one point for its record fifth Commissioner’s Cup, 176.5 to 175.5. The Bearkats previously won the Cup in 2005, 2006 and 2007 and with Cup wins the last two years, they have won five of the last 10. Sam Houston is one of two current Southland universities to win at least two Commissioner’s Cups, along with Stephen F. Austin, which has won twice. 176.5 43.5 Stephen F. Austin 152.5last_img read more

Line-ups: Atalanta v Man City

first_imgJosip Ilicic is again the False 9 with Papu Gomez and Mario Pasalic, as Atalanta seek their first Champions League point against Manchester City. It kicks off at the Stadio Giuseppe Meazza, known also as San Siro, at 20.00 GMT. Follow the build-up and action as it happens from this game and Lokomotiv Moscow-Juventus on the LIVEBLOG. La Dea are joint fourth in Serie A, but have lost all three Champions League outings so far, including a 5-1 defeat at the Etihad, despite originally taking the lead. Duvan Zapata is still out of action, while Luis Muriel is left on the bench as a wild card for the second half, meaning Ilicic is once again the False 9, supported by Gomez and surprisingly Pasalic rather than Ruslan Malinovskyi. Marten De Roon returns after missing the 2-0 loss to Cagliari through suspension. Manchester City made the trip without Phil Foden, who was sent off in the last meeting with Atalanta, while David Silva, Rodri, Oleksandr Zinchenko, Leroy Sane and Aymeric Laporte are injured. Ederson returns in goal after being rested in the 2-1 win over Southampton at the weekend, while Gabriel Jesus gets the nod upfront rather than Sergio Aguero. Former Juventus and Inter full-back Joao Cancelo replaces Jose Tasende. Atalanta: Gollini; Toloi, Palomino, Djimisti; Hateboer, Freuler, De Roon, Castagne; Pasalic; Ilicic, Gomez Atalanta bench: Sportiello, Kjaer, Masiello, Muriel, Arana, Malinovskyi, Barrow Man City: Ederson; Cancelo, Otamendi, Fernandinho, Mendy; Gundogan, De Bruyne; Mahrez, Bernardo Silva, Sterling; Gabriel Jesus Man City bench: Bravo, Walker, Stones, Aguero, Angelino, Garcia, Doyle Ref: Kulbakov (BLR) Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/last_img read more

Manmohan Singh visits CWG venues, takes stock of preparations

first_imgPrime Minister Manmohan Singh on Sunday visited the Jawaharlal Nehru sports complex here and asked authorities to “redouble their efforts” to quickly complete remaining works as people were expecting a “flawless” opening to the Commonwealth Games.The venues for the Commonwealth Games are yet to be completedTerming the sports complex as “beautiful”, Singh urged the authorities “to redouble their efforts to quickly complete whatever works remained as people were expecting a spectacular and flawless opening to the CWG.”The Prime Minister visited the stadium, the venue of the opening and closing ceremonies of the October games, on Sunday morning.He was shown various facilities there including the playing fields, royal box, stands for spectators, security and other arrangements, PMO officials said.Singh’s visit comes as part of the series of steps he has taken to streamline and expedite the preparations for the October 3-14 mega event which have been rocked by a spate of corruption allegations.The Prime Minister, accompanied by Sports Minister M S Gill and Organising Committee chairman Suresh Kalmadi, went around the stadium and saw for himself the facilities and the work being done.Singh was there at the sports complex for over 20 minutes. Reporters were not allowed inside the venue during the Prime Minister’s visit.Concerned by the delays and the corruption charges, Singh had convened a high-level meeting on August 14 to review the preparations for the Games.A committee of bureaucrats headed by Cabinet Secretary K M Chandrasekhar was formed and given overriding powers by bringing into its ambit the Games Organising Committee that has been tainted following corruption allegations.advertisementObserving that there have been “slippages” in time schedules and deficiencies noticed, Singh had directed that a thorough probe should be held by the ministries concerned into complaints of “procedural and other irregularities” and “those found guilty should face severe and exemplary punishment”.He had instructed that all pending works should be completed in a time-bound manner and decided to visit select venues of the Games in the last week of this month.last_img read more

2012 Defence Nationals

first_imgThe 2012 Defence Force Nationals will be played from Monday, 29 October until Friday, 2 November at the Enoggera Barracks in Brisbane. 21 teams from across Australia will take part in the event, including three invitational teams from New Zealand, from as far away as the southern states and the Northern Territory.Six Constituent Bodies (CB) will take part in the championships – Northern Territory, South Queensland, Sydney Metros, Southern States, ACT/Country and North Queensland as well as New Zealand. The teams will compete across three divisions – Men’s Open, Women’s Open and Senior Men. Rounds games will be played on the first three days of competition, before finals are played on Thursday. There will be a Trans Tasman event on the Friday across the Men’s Open, Women’s Open and Men’s 30’s divisions, with each division to play one game each against New Zealand. Last year’s Champion CB, South Queensland will be looking for another solid performance at the event, and has entered five teams into the championships. ACT/County was named last year’s Most Improved CB. For more information and to keep up-to-date with all of the latest news and results from the 2012 Defence Nationals, please visit the following website:  http://www.sportingpulse.com/assoc_page.cgi?c=14-6027-0-0-0 Related LinksDefence Nationalslast_img read more

Street Banners designed by local artist for the 2020 BC Winter Games

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Local woman, Harriet Stanford designed the new street banners that can be seen on 100th street to commemorate the upcoming 2020 BC Winter Games.When the Fort St. John Community Arts Council put out a call for proposals, Stanford decided to try her hand at designing them with the representation of four different sports, which are displayed in a northern context.  “I’ve always enjoyed creating art, but I’ve never done it professionally,” says Stanford. “Creating these banners gave me a new skill set to work with.” “There are big skies, northern lights, wind and snow. I wanted to pick lesser represented sports and put them firmly in a northern context,” says Stanford. Fort St. John will be host to the BC Winter Games in seven months and welcoming up to 1,200 athletes, 300 coaches and 200 officials to the region. With the economic impact estimated to be approximately $1.6-million for the city. “The Games are an opportunity for us to showcase our community to the province. The Arts Council coming on board with this year’s banner design honouring sport is just one more demonstration of our community pulling together,” says Darren Snider, President of the Fort St. John BC Games Society. “The new street banners are a perfect example of how these major events bring our community together. The Fort St. John Community Arts Council has been instrumental in creating incredible street banners over the years, and this year’s program continues that tradition,” says Mayor Lori Ackerman. Stanford has lived in Fort St. John her whole life, even though she has recently moved away, she still resides in Northern BC and shared she is proud to be from the northern part of the province.last_img read more

No competition with brother Aparshakti

first_imgNew Delhi: Actor Aparshakti Khurana says there can’t be any scope of competition between him and his brother Ayushmann Khurrana. “Competition generally happens between two equals. In our case, Ayushmann and I are in different spaces of cinema. He has always been a front-runner. His films differ from mine, and so does our audience.” “There can’t be any comparison, because comparison takes place between two equals and we both have different paths in the industry. There can’t be any competition,” Aparshakti said. Also Read – I have personal ambitions now: PriyankaHe also shared his desire to work with his elder brother on screen. “Ayushmann is a brilliant actor. He is doing a great job. We both really want to work together. Unfortunately, we have not got any script yet,” he said. He revealed that both of them are looking forward to collaborate on something special. Aparshakti is riding high on the success of Luka Chuppi, after wooing the audience with his comical performance in the 2018 hit Stree. Aparshakti’s next big screen appearance will be alongside Varun Dhawan in Street Dancer 3D.last_img read more

Car Crash Amina Balafrej Still in Coma Family Demands Investigation

first_imgAgadir – Amina Balafrej, professor of medicine and Pediatric Diabetes chief of staff of Rabat’s Children’s hospital, is in a profound coma, under intensive surveillance, since August 31st, 2013. She was struck by a reckless driver who broke the 60km/hr speed limit by much, he is still at large, and no investigation was launched.Amina is a famous woman in Morocco, particularly in the medical field, as she is the founder of a pediatric diabetes service that receives over 130 new diabetic children every year. Taking them in charge by providing three key ingredients: standardization with elaboration of protocols, organized therapeutic education and material aid provided to the most financially restricted patients’ families. Dr. Balafrej’s family have posted a message, inviting any person having been present at the accident site to send an email to [email protected], since no investigation was launched, her undignified daughter, Dr. Sara’s desperately calls for any help.Her daughter, also a professor of medicine, had launched a petition collecting 14,000 signatures demanding an investigation, as she writes that the agressor in question had been -taken in charge- while her mother had been abandoned on the sidewalk, before she was taken to the emergency and registered under “X”, without any decent care for hours.Sara explained that her mother’s ID cards were not examined, although present in her handbag, her cellphone was switched off, and her family had remained uninformed.Consequently, her family had not been able to reach her for five precious hours, during which they could have spared her from the profound coma she is presently in.“My mother sacrified her life for her country, to gratuitously treat thousands of children of modest families. She created the first service of Pediatric Diabetes in the country. While the offender is free, no judge was assigned to the case. We had to fight for weeks to get the list of names of people involved, in vain” added Sara.Shortly before the accident, the victim had been preparing for the July 2014 opening of an ambulatory follow-up center which would group all necessary services for diabetic children, including consultations, psychology, dietetics, day hospital, etc.Whether the victim of such a crime is a doctor who has given a lot to humanity or just a man working a regular 9-5 job to provide for himself and his family, it is always heart-wrenching to hear of such stories, and to witness the escalating staggering rates of hit and runs, and crimes in Morocco.Our prayers go out for Dr. Amina Balafrej, her family, and for all those who have been victims of any abuse, and are desperately seeking justice. © Morocco World News. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, rewritten or redistributedlast_img read more

How The Winter X Games Designs Its Courses

The winter X Games in Aspen1FiveThirtyEight is owned by ESPN, which also runs the X Games. began on Thursday, which means extreme skiers and snowboarders performing tricks that will make your stomach drop, even if you’re just watching from the comfort of your couch. Each year these athletes attempt to jump higher, fly further, spin faster and generally do more ridiculous stunts than they did the year before. And as the competitors progress, the courses they ride have to evolve, too. To deliver the thrills that audiences and athletes want, course designers must find ways to allow riders to go bigger without compromising their safety.Chris Gunnarson is the president of Snow Park Technologies, which for 21 years has been building, among other things, snow features for these games, including jumps from small to massive. I asked Gunnarson to walk me through some of the math involved in building courses for two of winter X Games’ most iconic events: big air and slopestyle. Big air is just one massive, terrifying jump where the goal is for athletes to land the biggest trick they can. Slopestyle is a long run that starts with a relatively level section at the top, where skiers and snowboarders grind and do tricks off rails and boxes, before the course descends rapidly into a series of three increasingly large jumps.As the courses and performances get bigger and more innovative, athletes are continually giving SPT feedback on how the jumps feel and whether they allow the latest tricks. But as important as rider feedback is, Gunnarson bases much of the course design on the cold realities of physics.“A simple ballistics calculator” — like one a hunter might use — “is one tool used to look at what gravity will do to a moving object, like an arrow being shot from a bow,” Gunnarson told me. “The initial angle and speed of the arrow will dictate the distance it will go and the arcing path it will follow.” Similarly, if you know the speed at which the skier or snowboarder hits the jump, how much they weigh and what angle they take off at, you can draw the arc of their trajectory and more or less pinpoint where they will land.The jumps on both the big air and slopestyle courses will have a final launch angle of 32 to 35 degrees, and each landing area has a “sweet spot,” which has a grade of somewhere between 34 and 37 degrees. Given a typical rider’s speed and the angle at which they take off, that slope is the best way to allow them to come down, set the edge of their board or skis, and gradually change the downward momentum they picked up while falling back into forward momentum. If the landing zone is too flat, all that downward force goes directly into the rider’s legs, which may result in more impact than they can handle. If it’s too steep, the rider can’t slow themselves down and regain control.On the slopestyle course, Gunnarson says, the lip of the jump is typically four to eight feet above the top of the landing area, which helps the athletes get more hang time than the ramp alone would give them. The horizontal distance between the lip and the landing area increases with each jump to account for the rider’s ever-increasing speed as they come screaming down the mountain.While these calculations seem simple enough in theory, SPT’s builders must also take into account a number of confounding real-world variables that make the equations much more complicated. The quality of the snow changes how much friction is dragging on the board or skis, making the jump faster or slower, and of course each rider’s mass affects their speed through the air. The way competitors hit the jump matters, too. “One rider might ‘pop’ off the takeoff, thereby increasing their launch angle and potentially increasing their height in the air and the distance they travel,” Gunnarson said. “Another rider might ‘press’” — bend their knees as they take off — “by absorbing the takeoff, thereby decreasing their launch angle, which may also decrease their height in the air and the distance they travel.”These factors can create a tremendous amount of variation in where the rider comes down, which creates a potentially dangerous problem. Even when conditions are ideal, a handful of riders are injured every year simply because they are pushing their limits. (ESPN stated that it does not publicly share event injury statistics.) So building a landing area that helps keep athletes safe is all about putting the sweet spot in a location where riders taking a wide range of trajectories can hit it.SPT has found that for both slopestyle and big air, the sweet spot should begin between 55 and 75 feet from the lip of the jump and should maintain a consistent angle for at least 100 feet before it starts to fade into the normal slope. Essentially, the course designers make it nearly impossible to overshoot the landing, even when riders cover a huge distance — some of the snowboarders in the 2016 big air event flew more than 100 feet.The jumps that course designers build for the X Games are very different from the features you’d typically find at a ski resort. Everything is scaled up and built for elite riders who are constantly redefining what is possible in their sport. And neither the designers nor the athletes could pull it off without the math that determines how the courses can keep up with riders while also keeping them safe. read more