Pharmalittle: Coronavirus vaccine testing starts in Seattle area; New Mexico law caps monthly insulin co-pay at $25

first_img Alex Hogan/STAT Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Ed Silverman Log In | Learn More @Pharmalot Hello, everyone, and how are you today? We are doing just fine, thank you, courtesy of clear and sunny skies hovering over the Pharmalot campus, which has settled down now that the short person has left for the local schoolhouse. This leaves us to engage in our usual rituals. You know the drill — we are firing up the coffee kettle for a cup of stimulation and getting our to-do list in order. Never a day goes by without a to-do list, yes? So time to get cracking. Here are some tidbits to help you on your own journey. Hope today is successful and do keep in touch…Researchers have started to recruit healthy Seattle-area volunteers to participate in the first clinical trial of an experimental coronavirus vaccine, a faster-than-expected start for the first vaccine readied for testing, The Wall Street Journal notes. Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle said Wednesday it aims to enroll 45 adults from the region in the trial. The study will test the safety of various doses of the vaccine developed by Moderna (MRNA) and whether the shots produce an immune response. What is it? [email protected] Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED What’s included?center_img STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Pharmalittle: Coronavirus vaccine testing starts in Seattle area; New Mexico law caps monthly insulin co-pay at $25 About the Author Reprints Pharmalot Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. By Ed Silverman March 5, 2020 Reprints GET STARTED Tags pharmalittleSTAT+last_img read more

141 baby Bell’s turtles returned to wild

first_img141 baby Bell’s turtles returned to wild Turtles Forever has moved one step closer to success with the release of the last of this year’s 141 baby Bell’s Turtles into the Roumalla Creek today. Now at its halfway mark, the 10-year project aims to bring back sustainable turtle populations in NSW’s Northern Tablelands.When fewer and fewer young Bell’s Turtles were being detected, Turtles Forever was launched thanks to a $1M NSW Environmental Trust grant led by Northern Tablelands Local Land Services in partnership with the University of New England, turtle ecologists, Canines for Wildlife and the Department of Primary Industries.UNE researcher Lou Streeting started a PhD to look at why there were so few young turtles and found feral foxes were raiding more than 95 per cent of Bell’s Turtle nests.“So far we have helped more than 1500 hatchling turtles join the population,” Ms Streeting said.“Of those, more than 1000 were from nests that we protected on the riverbank, and 533 were from eggs that we incubated and hatched in the laboratory at UNE.“We are now seeing those hatchlings surviving and flourishing in the wild as two- and three-year olds. It’s been extraordinary to be part of this project and our results provide hope for the future of Bell’s Turtles.”The first steps in the incredible Turtles Forever story were thanks to science, the community, landholders and different agencies working collaboratively, Local Land Services’ Marty Dillon said.“Private landowners coming on board to allow our researchers to access their properties to protect nests with wire mesh or fox exclusion fencing has been key to the success,” Mr Dillon said.“Saving these turtles ignites people’s enthusiasm – landowners, school children – it’s uplifting to help effect a positive outcome.”The Turtles Forever project is protecting the endangered Bell’s Turtle which is found only in the Namoi, Gwydir, Severn and Deepwater River systems in the Northern Tablelands of NSW.“Turtles Forever was funded as one of the Trust’s nine Saving our Species Partnerships Grant Projects, which aim to improve the chances of survival for over 30 threatened species in NSW,” Environmental Trust project officer Kersten Tuckey said.“These markers of success, halfway through the partnership grant program, are exciting and a testament to the passion and commitment of our project partners,” she said. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:AusPol, Bell, children, community, Deepwater, Effect, environment, future, Government, Local Land Services, New South Wales, NSW, project, school, science, species, sustainable, university, University of New England, wildlifelast_img read more

Spieth (T-4) hoping for a little weekend chaos

first_imgAUGUSTA, Ga. – Compared to Thursday’s high-wire act, Jordan Spieth’s second round at his eighth Masters was as ho-hum as they come. There were five birdies, only one of which (No. 17) featured a make of more than 7 feet, and a single bogey at the old arch enemy 12th hole. He was putting for birdie on 14 of 18 greens and playing from the fairway on 11 of 14 holes. If Friday was Baskin-Robbins, Spieth’s 68 would have been a big scoop of vanilla. Most players would cherish that kind of tedium, but not Spieth. Spieth says he only wants boring rounds but that’s akin to a gambler who says he only wants safe bets. The 27-year-old relishes life in the margins and memories are rarely born from the mundane. Just look at the green jacket he won and those he’s lost. The final round of his 2015 triumph was a study in his extremes – six birdies, four bogeys over a fitful final round. The next year he birdied four consecutive holes before the turn to take the lead and then imploded with a bogey-bogey-triple bogey start to his second nine. 85th Masters Tournament: Full-field scores | Full coverage On Friday it was again the 12th hole that got him. After dumping his tee shot into the front bunker, he blasted to 6 feet from a bad lie and missed the par putt before tossing his golf ball into Rae’s Creek. “If any body of water is there, I’m going to throw it in the body of water and change to a new golf ball,” Spieth said. “I don’t want to look at that golf ball anymore, so it goes into the water and then I go to another ball.” Maybe it’s the emotion of the moment. Maybe it’s a heightened sense of accomplishment that comes with a round well-fought. Whatever it is, Spieth has always been more comfortable on the razor’s edge. Jordan Spieth just trying to build off ‘steady progress’ Even on the kind of cool and breezy Friday that reminds you of why they play this tournament in April and not, say, July or August, it was the hero stuff that he wanted to talk about. The make-it-up-as-you-go stuff like at the 13th hole after his drive sailed into the pines right of the fairway. “My 3-wood out of the trees on 13, I just kind of punch cut a 3-wood that was a really nice shot, set up a really great angle to make birdie, and if it comes out the wrong way I can make 6,” he said. “You look for moments that turn momentum; that was a good one for me.” Is that, turn momentum or ignite the imagination? It’s hard to say. Just to prove the point, Spieth was asked how he plays Augusta National differently now compared to his first tour he took around the old fruit nursery in 2014. “I think I actually play maybe even a little more aggressively now than I did then,” he shrugged. There was also a curious smirk when he was asked about the upcoming weekend and a forecast that promises to bring wind and rain and even more chaos. “I’m happy that the golf course has the opportunity to play more and more difficult over the weekend,” he said. “Personally, I’m looking forward to that kind of challenge, and I think that could be an advantage to me if I’m in control of the ball.” Had the pandemic not pushed last year’s Masters to the fall, Spieth probably wouldn’t have had the same edge. At this point last year, he was still searching for answers and something close to a repeatable swing. But all that has changed. Following months of trending in the right direction he won for the first time in more than three years on the PGA Tour last week in San Antonio and he arrived at Augusta National with a familiar swagger. He’s not all the way back, but in Spieth’s twisted formula that only makes things more entertaining. “I’m not in a place where I can say I’m standing up and just striping, but I’m in a place to where I’ve got it to where I can manage it and I can manage around this golf course,” he said. With the degree of difficulty only increasing over the weekend that puts Spieth right where he wants to be – on the edge.last_img read more

Revenues from tourism in 2015 grew by 7,6 percent

first_imgAccording to the Croatian National Bank (CNB), in 2015, revenues from tourism from foreign guests amounted to 7 billion and 961 million, which compared to 2014 (7 billion and 401 million euros), represents growth of 7,6 percent, ie EUR 559,5 million.Revenues for personal reasons in that period amounted to 7 billion and 742 million euros and increased by 7,4 percent, or 534,1 million euros compared to 2014. Revenues for business reasons in 2015 for the first time since 2007 increased compared to the previous year in the amount of EUR 219 million, ie an increase of as much as 13 percent or EUR 25 million more than in 2014. year.In the fourth quarter, ie during the months of October, November and December 2015, revenues from tourism amounted to EUR 663,5 million, which is an increase of 622,8 percent compared to the same period last year (EUR 6,4 million), ie an increase of € 40,7 million. Revenues for personal reasons increased by 40,2 million euros, or 6,9 percent. In the fourth quarter of 2015, these revenues amounted to EUR 620,9 million, while for the same period last year they amounted to EUR 580,7 million. Revenues from business arrivals in the fourth quarter amounted to EUR 42,6 million, an increase of 1,2 percent and EUR 0,5 million more than in the same period in 2014.”We are very pleased with the revenues, which reached almost 8 billion euros, which was according to our expectations. With domestic consumption, revenues will amount to at least 9,3 billion euros, which is the best result so far. This is the result of the work of synergistic work of everyone in the tourism sector, and I congratulate them all on the excellent results last year. Given the investments planned this year in both the hotel sector and additional facilities, I believe that 2016 will surpass 2015. “Pointed out the Minister of Tourism Anton Kliman.The share of revenues from travel – tourism in total GDP in 2015 was 18,1 place which represents an increase of 0,9 percentage points compared to 2014. In the fourth quarter, the share of revenues from travel – tourism in total GDP was 6 percent, which compared to the same period in 2014 represents an increase in the share of 0,2 percentage points.Source: Ministry of Tourismlast_img read more

In the first nine months, Zadar County realized over 11 million overnight stays

first_imgIn the period January-September 2016, there were 1.513.077 arrivals and 11.124.696 overnight stays in Zadar County. Out of that, there were 219.600 domestic tourists, and they realized 2.576.460 overnight stays, while there were 1.293.477 foreign tourists who realized 8.548.236 overnight stays. In the first nine months, most guests stayed in private accommodation 685.711, which generated 4.836.388 overnight stays, followed by hotels with 285.951 guests and 1.137.411 overnight stays, and camps with 262.348 guests and 1.912.865 overnight stays.Regarding foreign guests in the period January-September 2016, most guests were from Germany 220.382 guests and 1.864.960 overnight stays, Slovenia 182.560 guests and 1.488.443 overnight stays, Austria 104.118 guests and 683.495 overnight stays, the Czech Republic 98.224 guests and 734.866 overnight stays , Poland 88.250 guests and 634.082 overnight stays, Slovakia 72.723 guests and 532.307 overnight stays, Hungary 67.418 guests and 409.368 overnight stays, Italy with 65.944 guests and 370.728 overnight stays, France 447.868 guests and 209.165 overnight stays and the Netherlands 33.539 guests and 240.099 overnight stays.In September 2016, there were 161.414 arrivals and 1.278.868 overnight stays. Out of that, there were 13.501 domestic tourists, and they realized 292.372 overnight stays. There were 147.913 foreign tourists in September, and they realized 986.496 overnight stays. In September, most guests stayed in private accommodation, 52.686, and 408.596 overnight stays were realized. They are followed by hotels with 47.048 guests and 174.018 overnight stays, camps with 29.784 guests and 233.234 overnight stays.As the eVisitor system was introduced this year, it is not possible to say with certainty what the growth of arrivals and overnight stays is, but one thing is for sure, the current tourist season is a record in all segments, both globally and in Zadar County.last_img read more

Interview: Sheila King talks luxury, premium and travel retail

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Argos Place Five on All-GSC Team; Lafrance Earns Pitcher of the Year

first_img Jillian Lafrance (Photo by Ron Besser) Share Argos Place Five on All-GSC Team; Lafrance Earns Pitcher of the Yearcenter_img BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – The Argonaut softball team tabbed five spots on this year’s All-Gulf South Conference teams. Pitcher Jillian Lafrance (Calgary, Alberta/Charleston Southern) and first basemen Shannon Miles (Shreveport, La./Bossier Parrish CC) were both named to the All-GSC First Team, as Lafrance captured the GSC East Pitcher of the Year laurel. Pitcher Emily Burge (Pace, Fla./Pace HS), shortstop Caurie Miller (Orlando, Fla./Troy), and leftfielder Melissa Chastang (Satsuma, Ala./Satsuma HS) earned Second Team garners after a successful 2009 regular season. Lafrance was a four-time GSC Pitcher of the Week award winner this season, possessing a 1.37 ERA on the season. The junior threw 204 frames to lead the GSC, tying the league with 23 wins. Her 200 fanned batters rank among the GSC . Lafrance has consistently ranked in the NCAA Division II top ten in wins, and has danced among the nation’s top 25 in earned run average. She earned a place on last year’s All-GSC Second Team, and earned her first First Team selection after another dominate season in the circle. Miles spent her first season with the Argonauts, and led the team with a .344 batting average. Her 55 hits, 12 doubles, and nine homeruns ranks her at the top of UWF’s offense. The junior also drove in a team-high 44 runs, slugging a .588 on the season. Defensively, Miles made just six errors this season for a .977 fielding percentage. Burge rounds out her four year career at West Florida with an All-GSC selection after breaking UWF’s career strikeout record. Burge fanned 192 batters in 170 innings pitched this season to total 714 career punch outs for the Argos. The senior posted a 17-9 record in the regular season, holding her opponents to a .217 at the plate. Miller garnered her first All-GSC honor in her senior season with the Argos after providing consistency and composure in the middle infield. Miller’s relentless patience at the plate ranks her second among GSC competitors in walks, drawing 38 so far. The shortstop’s .265 average led to 41 hits and nine doubles, along with 35 RBIs that rank her second among her teammates.Chastang earned her first career All-GSC award this season after spending her third consecutive year as UWF’s starting left field. The junior displayed her versatility at the plate after transitioning from the nine hole, to a starting role in the second spot of West Florida’s batting order. Chastang’s consistency guided her to a team-best 16 sacrifices this season. She was also one of the more successful clutch hitters for the Argos, hitting .309 with runners in scoring position.The Argos open the GSC tournament on Friday at 2:30pm with West opponent, Arkansas-Monticello. Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

Irie takes two-stroke advantage

first_imgINZAI, Chiba Pref. – Tour veteran Yuka Irie held a two-shot lead at the midpoint of the Kracie Philanthropy LPGA Players Championship on Friday after matching the day’s low with a 4-under-par 69. Irie had an eagle, five birdies and three bogeys at the Narashino Country Club’s par-73 King/Queen Course en route to a two-day total of 6-under 140. South Korea’s Lee Ji Hyun shot a 71 to sit alone in second. The 38-year-old Irie, whose fourth and last career win dates back to August 1998 at the NEC Karuizawa 72, started the day two strokes behind first-round leader Kaori Aoyama and made four birdies in the first seven holes before ending the front nine with a bogey. IN FIVE EASY PIECES WITH TAKE 5 GET THE BEST OF THE JAPAN TIMESlast_img read more

William & Mary Loses Logo Appeal to NCAA

first_imgGothamite powersurge Members Posted October 11, 2006 William & Mary Loses Logo Appeal to NCAA Members Share on other sites 0 Posted October 11, 2006 65 11,387 posts 1 leopard88 22,645 Why isn’t Notre Dame in this? I think it’s perfectly reasonable to let the affected groups decide. To my knowledge, there is no significant part of the Irish-American community that objects to Notre Dame’s mascot (or the Celtics’, for that matter).Were there, then you would have a valid point. Until then, it doesn’t seem like a very valid objection. 2 William & Mary Loses Logo Appeal to NCAA Link to post zman65 Link to post By zman65, October 11, 2006 in Sports Logo News 0 2,943 Posted October 11, 2006 9,812 posts Link to post 0 Epiphanic 2 2,943 339 posts 12 Link to post 0 Members 65 Link to post 339 posts 573 12 Share this post NCAA – Nazi Collegiate Athletic Association 13 well at least there’s baseball Posted October 11, 2006 Personally, I think if the NCAA is concerned about the use of “derogatory” nicknames they shouldn’t ban it from just the post-season. Grow a pair and ban it outright. That being said, I don’t agree with the NCAA decision in the first place. In all honesty, why stop with Native American names? Why isn’t Notre Dame in this? Using the nickname “Fighting Irish” is no different than North Dakota’s “Fighting Sioux” or Illinois’ “Fighting Illini.” Is it because the Irish aren’t Native Americans? Is it because they have the “blessing” of the Irish community? Or is it because the Irish community really doesn’t care? I’m not sure. If the NCAA never imposed this ban to be more politically correct, would there even be any discussion on the nickname of schools like North Dakota? I doubt it.I hope W&M comes up with something really cool for a logo if they have to change it, but I think it’s silly that they need to.P.S. If I sound insensitive, I apologize. It is not my intent. 22,645 Members Well, FSU did secure the consent of the Seminole nation. There is a significant distinction there. 22,645 71 posts powersurge Share this post 1,386 posts Posted October 11, 2006 6,091 posts NCAA – Nazi Collegiate Athletic AssociationGodwin’s Law! 65 Maybe there are, but the NCAA has an across-the-board policy. It’s probably the only way to address it – make a sweeping policy, and those teams with a legitimate case to exempt themseves have to make that case.I don’t have a problem with the policy, either. Maybe it helps that I think “Tribe” is a stupid name….Well we obviously disagree on the policy but now that I think of it I agree that ‘Tribe’ really is a dumb name for a team. It sounds like its missing something. I guess that ‘something’ is the NAME of a tribe huh? Geoff 22,645 You’re Khilling me, Smalls. 0 Share this post 0 Location:Pensacola, FL jkrdevil powersurge 0 Share on other sites Page 1 of 2   Share on other sites Link to post Followers 0 Location:Washington, D.C. 94 Link to post SportsLogos.Net 22,645 6,091 posts 22,645 0 well at least there’s baseball Next Link to post Share on other sites Gothamite Go To Topic Listing Share on other sites 0 0 53,285 posts 22,645 22,645 0 Posted October 11, 2006 0 Share on other sites 0 Location:The Land of Pleasant Living Share this post 0 Epiphanic 65 Posted October 11, 2006 well at least there’s baseball 53,285 posts Members Posted October 11, 2006 6,091 posts 143 posts Share this post jkrdevil Maybe there are, but the NCAA has an across-the-board policy. It’s probably the only way to address it – make a sweeping policy, and those teams with a legitimate case to exempt themseves have to make that case.I don’t have a problem with the policy, either. Maybe it helps that I think “Tribe” is a stupid name…. Link to post In the Indian examples, I highly doubt you will find a situation where Native Americans themselves adopted the nicknames.I can’t speak for all the universities across the country, but in Oklahoma at least there are numerous examples of high schools and colleges adopting Native American nicknames due to the prevalence of native peoples in our state. For example, Northeastern State University in Tahlequah adopted the “Redmen” nickname as a way of honoring the heritage of the school and acknowledging the ancestry of a great number of its students. NSU was founded in 1851 as the Cherokee National Female Seminary, and to this day still has the largest enrollment of Native American students of any public institution of higher education in the country. And as I said in the North Dakota thread, if you polled the Cherokee students on the NSU you’d find that a substantial majority either don’t care about the issue or oppose changing the Redmen nickname.On a related note, my high school alma mater’s nickname of “Savages” was first suggested in 1924 by a Choctaw student. The nickname is still supported and endorsed by the Choctaw Nation, and many take pride in the school and its traditions. I guess we just have different priorities in this part of the world than to get bent out of shape by the name of a football team.Thanks for the additional information. Obviously, I spoke a little too quickly.That being said, of the examples you provided, only your high school’s nickname specifically seems to result from the suggestion or adoption of a nickname by a Native American group. With regard to the other high schools, do you know if the student bodies were involved in the selection process or did the administrations generally choose the Native American names because there were a large number of Native Americans at the schools and/or in the area? 65 FSU can still use it because they have always had the blessing of the Seminole tribe of Florida. William and Mary’s nickname was not tribe specific thus making it hard to get the proper blessing and paper work that would at least allow them to appeal to the NCAA. I think the Sioux can win this suit if they have the blessing of the Tribe. 65 22,645 0 2 0 0 Share this post SportsLogos.Net mydogisgomez powersurge Share this post 0 Share on other sites Forums Home (edited) Share this post Share this post Share on other sites 94 Gothamite 22,645 I hope when the NCAA loses its case with North Dakota, it sets a precedent that invalidates its policy with every school. I would love to see damages. Any team that spent a dime to change their logos would get reimbursed. Punative damages would be great on top.What a frakkin’ joke. Link to post Members Share this post 0 Location:Franklin, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana 0 mydogisgomez Members five boroughs, one City. leopard88 doafhat 4,065 posts Posted October 11, 2006 This topic is now closed to further replies. William & Mary Loses Logo Appeal to NCAA Share this post I’m still perplexed by the fact that Marquette couldn’t keep the name ‘Warriors’. A warrior by definition is:?noun 1. a person engaged or experienced in warfare; soldier. 2. a person who shows or has shown great vigor, courage, or aggressiveness, as in politics or athletics. So what gives? Did they change because of other reasons?center_img 0 Members 0 Members 0 3,187 posts Members 2,943 The College of William and Mary (nickname: “Tribe”) was one among many NCAA schools to be on the list of schools that would be barred from postseason competition if they did not alter team names/logos featuring Native American imagery.They appealed, and word came in that the nickname Tribe, having connotations outside of a Native American context, could remain as the team’s nickname.But the team’s logo, featuring an interlocking W and M, was still deemed inappropriate because it features two feathers. The school, unlike North Dakota, has chosen not to sue the NCAA. So, as of today, they are officially looking into doing a logo redesign. Location:The Land of Pleasant Living powersurge Why isn’t Notre Dame in this? Using the nickname “Fighting Irish” is no different than North Dakota’s “Fighting Sioux” or Illinois’ “Fighting Illini.” Is it because the Irish aren’t Native Americans? Is it because they have the “blessing” of the Irish community? Or is it because the Irish community really doesn’t care? I’m not sure. Notre Dame isn’t included because the name doesn’t just have the blessing of the Irish community, it was selected/adopted by the Irish community that predominated at Notre Dame in the early 20th Century.From irishlegends.comIrish LoreSportswriter and Notre Dame grad Francis Wallace was the one who entrenched the “Fighting Irish” nickname in the 1920s, according to author Murray Sperber. Wallace used the moniker in his stories on Notre Dame football for the New York Post and the New York Daily News. Other papers followed suit, and the school itself adopted “Fighting Irish” as its official nickname in 1927.In the Indian examples, I highly doubt you will find a situation where Native Americans themselves adopted the nicknames. tomhunter8 65 65 Share this post Share on other sites 65 Share this post 0 leopard88 Link to post Link to post 6,091 posts Posted October 11, 2006 0 Members Lucky Number 0 0 Share on other sites doafhat 0 13 Sports Logo News Posted October 11, 2006 Share this post Being from Texas, I’m offended that Houston uses “Texans” as their mascot. It’s very degrading to me (especially ’cause the team stinks). I really don’t care, but how is using Native American names any worse than any other ethnic or geographical group as a mascot? “Redskins” is pretty offensive, but Braves, Seminoles, Warriors are no worse than Minutemen, Cowboys, or Cornhuskers. Share on other sites 22,645 Share this post Posted October 11, 2006 Members Posted October 11, 2006 2,943 In the Indian examples, I highly doubt you will find a situation where Native Americans themselves adopted the nicknames.I can’t speak for all the universities across the country, but in Oklahoma at least there are numerous examples of high schools and colleges adopting Native American nicknames due to the prevalence of native peoples in our state. For example, Northeastern State University in Tahlequah adopted the “Redmen” nickname as a way of honoring the heritage of the school and acknowledging the ancestry of a great number of its students. NSU was founded in 1851 as the Cherokee National Female Seminary, and to this day still has the largest enrollment of Native American students of any public institution of higher education in the country. And as I said in the North Dakota thread, if you polled the Cherokee students on the NSU you’d find that a substantial majority either don’t care about the issue or oppose changing the Redmen nickname.On a related note, my high school alma mater’s nickname of “Savages” was first suggested in 1924 by a Choctaw student. The nickname is still supported and endorsed by the Choctaw Nation, and many take pride in the school and its traditions. I guess we just have different priorities in this part of the world than to get bent out of shape by the name of a football team.Thanks for the additional information. Obviously, I spoke a little too quickly.That being said, of the examples you provided, only your high school’s nickname specifically seems to result from the suggestion or adoption of a nickname by a Native American group. With regard to the other high schools, do you know if the student bodies were involved in the selection process or did the administrations generally choose the Native American names because there were a large number of Native Americans at the schools and/or in the area?If such a case could be supported, the NCAA would likely approve the nickname, as they did with Florida State’s Seminoles. They have demonstrated a willingness to consider special cases.NCAA – Nazi Collegiate Athletic AssociationGiven up on rational discourse so quickly? Invoking Godwin’s Law so early in a conversation indicates that you are aware of abundent weaknesses in your argument. powersurge Master of the Irrelevant Gothamite 181 posts Posted October 11, 2006 Link to post Link to post Recommended Posts Geoff Link to post powersurge Edited October 11, 2006 by Gothamite Sign in to follow this   2,943 Master of the Irrelevant Share on other sites FSU can still use it because they have always had the blessing of the Seminole tribe of Florida. William and Mary’s nickname was not tribe specific thus making it hard to get the proper blessing and paper work that would at least allow them to appeal to the NCAA. I think the Sioux can win this suit if they have the blessing of the Tribe.I see your point, and I thought that at first. Then I began to think that since its not specific to a particular tribe and it really isn’t demeaning a tribe it should be fine. To call yourself a tribe isn’t the same as calling yourself Indians for example since most Native American tribes despise the use of that word, while ‘tribe’ is what they are call themselves. Maybe I’m not describing my point very well here, but I think they (NCAA) are splitting hairs (or better yet feathers). There are much worse names to go after other than “tribe”. Posted October 11, 2006 2,943 0 Posted October 11, 2006 Share this post 65 Posted October 11, 2006 Members Followers 0 Members Prev Posted October 11, 2006 13 Share this post Gothamite five boroughs, one City. Members Link to post Share on other sites 12 65 0 0 Link to post Share on other sites Share on other sites Gothamite 573 Members Share on other sites Gothamite five boroughs, one City. Share this post powersurge Share on other sites Hyperbole: It’s the best thing EVER! 1 All Activity Posted October 11, 2006 five boroughs, one City. Members Share on other sites 53,285 posts 53,285 posts Thanks for the additional information. Obviously, I spoke a little too quickly.That being said, of the examples you provided, only your high school’s nickname specifically seems to result from the suggestion or adoption of a nickname by a Native American group. With regard to the other high schools, do you know if the student bodies were involved in the selection process or did the administrations generally choose the Native American names because there were a large number of Native Americans at the schools and/or in the area?I assume that in many cases, the nicknames were adopted over time as is the case with how many mascots at other schools were adopted so many years ago, much like the example of Notre Dame came to be known as the Fighting Irish as you mentioned before. One other example of Native American mascots in the state of Oklahoma that I can cite to an extent is the Stilwell High School Indians, who were originally the “Indians” then changed to “Pirates” in 1927 before reverting back to the Indians in 1934. I can’t find the origins of the original Indians nickname, but here’s the story of the 1934 restoration of the name written by Gregg Stilwell of stilwellindians.org:Jerry Lewis was hired as head coach in 1933 and coached his squad to a finish of 6-4-1. Two of those wins, however, came via forfeits from Checotah and Westville. Lewis’s second year as coach resulted in a 5-6 record. The 1934 season will best be remembered as the year that Indian Pride came back to Stilwell. Due to an overwhelming outcry of fans the Indian was officially brought back as the school symbol. The moniker had several years of history behind it as it was used by “Every team since the school was established here at statehood with the exception of the past six years.” according to the 12-7-33 Stilwell Democrat-Journal, which went on to explain, “The name Indians is more suitable as practically every player on the team is of Indian extraction and Stilwell is the center of one of the greatest Indian populations in the United States.” “New uniforms with an Indian emblem have been ordered to replace the old Pirate emblem” wrote the DJ “No change will be made in the school colors which will remain red and white.” 2 Link to post Share on other sites Prev doafhat 0 65 Forums Home KJTALBOT 0 Sports Logo News Next zman65 Share this post Bow before my superior smartitude! Posted October 11, 2006 Members Page 1 of 2   KJTALBOT 8,640 posts 2 573 Sports Logos leopard88 Link to post Thats ridiculous. Feathers! friggin’ feathers! I can see maybe an Indian face and or Tomahawk but FEATHERS!!! ridiculous! But FSU can still use feathers AND a spear. Pure garbage. Fred T. Jane In the Indian examples, I highly doubt you will find a situation where Native Americans themselves adopted the nicknames.I can’t speak for all the universities across the country, but in Oklahoma at least there are numerous examples of high schools and colleges adopting Native American nicknames due to the prevalence of native peoples in our state. For example, Northeastern State University in Tahlequah adopted the “Redmen” nickname as a way of honoring the heritage of the school and acknowledging the ancestry of a great number of its students. NSU was founded in 1851 as the Cherokee National Female Seminary, and to this day still has the largest enrollment of Native American students of any public institution of higher education in the country. And as I said in the North Dakota thread, if you polled the Cherokee students on the NSU you’d find that a substantial majority either don’t care about the issue or oppose changing the Redmen nickname.On a related note, my high school alma mater’s nickname of “Savages” was first suggested in 1924 by a Choctaw student. The nickname is still supported and endorsed by the Choctaw Nation, and many take pride in the school and its traditions. I guess we just have different priorities in this part of the world than to get bent out of shape by the name of a football team. well at least there’s baseball Link to post Members Share on other sites doafhat Gothamite Members 94 Fred T. Jane tomhunter8 22,645 0 All Activity 9,812 posts Share this post Sign in to follow this   Sports Logos 0 Personally, I think if the NCAA is concerned about the use of “derogatory” nicknames they shouldn’t ban it from just the post-season. Grow a pair and ban it outright. That being said, I don’t agree with the NCAA decision in the first place. In all honesty, why stop with Native American names? Why isn’t Notre Dame in this? Using the nickname “Fighting Irish” is no different than North Dakota’s “Fighting Sioux” or Illinois’ “Fighting Illini.” Is it because the Irish aren’t Native Americans? Is it because they have the “blessing” of the Irish community? Or is it because the Irish community really doesn’t care? I’m not sure. If the NCAA never imposed this ban to be more politically correct, would there even be any discussion on the nickname of schools like North Dakota? I doubt it.I hope W&M comes up with something really cool for a logo if they have to change it, but I think it’s silly that they need to.P.S. If I sound insensitive, I apologize. It is not my intent.The NCAA can’t ban it outright because the NCAA has little control over the regular season. That falls to the conferences and individual schools. However the NCAA totally controls the postseason tournaments they sponsor, thus the ban for postseason. If it were across the board for regualr season and postseason they would run into more legal problems. That is also why this policy does not affect Division IA football programs at all because the NCAA does not sponsor a D-IA postseason.last_img read more

Dolly Parton dishes on “9 to 5” reboot, says she, Tomlin and Fonda are all on board

first_img20th Century-Fox/Getty Images(WASHINGTON, DC) — A report by Deadline Thursday said that a reboot of the legendary female empowerment comedy 9 to 5 is in the works.  On Thursday night’s episode of ABC News’ Nightline, Dolly Parton, the star of the original film, told ABC’s David Wright that she and her co-stars Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin are all on board for the new movie. The 1980 comedy featured Dolly, Tomlin and Fonda as a trio of secretaries who turn the tables on their “sexist, egotistical, lying, hypocritical bigot” of a boss, played by Dabney Coleman.  But in the current #MeToo environment, the movie seems more timely than ever.  Dolly says she initially wasn’t sure she wanted the film to be remade, but she likes the plot of this reboot.“I would always say, ‘I don’t chew my tobacco but once, let’s don’t mess up a good thing, let’s don’t try to redo 9 to 5,’ but this new idea looked like it was gonna bring some new girls in,” Dolly told Wright on Nightline. “And they’re gonna find us…the old characters — we’ve all come up with a business of our own —  so they come to find us to get some input on how they should help run the business.”But, noting her, Tomlin and Fonda’s ages — 72, 78 and 80, respectively —  Dolly joked, “I said we better get after it, or it’s gonna be 95 instead of 9 to 5!”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more