SHRM’s Best Kept Secret: the SHRM Foundation

first_imgLast question, do I have to be a SHRM member or contribute to the SHRM Foundation to use their complimentary resources?[Beth] No, as a public charity, the SHRM Foundation makes all of its resources available free to the public–both SHRM members and non-members– on its website. Hard copies of the most recent products are also available by request from the Foundation.My thanks to Beth for sharing her knowledge with us. While Beth did point out that the SHRM Foundation resources are free to anyone, keep in mind that they would not be able to create these resources without our support. So if you do find the resources useful, consider making a tax-deductible donation at shrmfoundation.org/donate.I’m always looking for well-prepared information about the future of work. I can tell you from personal experience, the SHRM Foundation creates quality research and information that you can use in your strategic planning, operational goal setting and business meetings.Image courtesy of Sharlyn Lauby The Society for Human Resources Management (SHRM) is my professional association. I support other professional organizations, but my first HR job was as a generalist so SHRM was the first professional association I joined. Every employer I’ve ever worked for supported my membership in SHRM and allowed me to attend SHRM professional development events. They also supported me being a SHRM volunteer leader.It wasn’t until I became a volunteer leader that I learned about the SHRM Foundation. That’s why I think of it as a best kept secret. The SHRM Foundation supports our role as human resources professionals through research, thought-leadership and awards. And frankly, we can all use good information to make our jobs easier. So I reached out to Beth McFarland, CAE to share a little more with you about what the Foundation does to help us in our daily jobs. Beth is the director of foundation programs with the SHRM Foundation and I’ve had the pleasure of working with her for years.Beth, can you share with readers some background about the SHRM Foundation (i.e., what it does, how long it’s been around, etc.)[Beth] The SHRM Foundation was created by SHRM in 1966, so we will be celebrating our 50th anniversary next year. Our main mission is really research and education. We support students and professionals in their lifelong learning by awarding more than $150,000 in education and certification scholarships annually.In addition, we develop educational materials for HR professionals and students, and fund original rigorous research to advance the knowledge base of the HR profession. To help educate HR professionals on the trends impacting the workplace, we introduced a major multi-year thought leadership initiative in 2013.As a special expertise panel member, I know a little about the thought leadership initiative you’re talking about. Tell us more about the project.[Beth] We believe that understanding the fundamental changes impacting the world of work is the first step to preparing for them—and ultimately leveraging them for competitive advantage. That’s why we launched a multi-phase initiative to identify and analyze critical trends likely to affect the workplace in the next 5-10 years. Through a rigorous process of surveys, expert-panel discussions and analysis conducted in partnership with the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), we identified three key themes and have been focusing our program of work on a different theme each year.In 2015, our focus is Engaging and Integrating a Global Workforce. We have released a report, written by the EIU that explains this theme in more detail. Later this year we’ll be releasing infographics and video interviews to help people learn more about this topic. Members of the SHRM expert panels are now working to identify specific ways these trends will impact the workplace and what HR can do now to prepare. Their final report will be released this fall. Visit our Digital Hub to learn more about SHRM Foundation thought leadership.  One of my go-to resources is the “Effective Practice Guidelines” series. Relevant information I can use every day. What other types of “thought leadership” are produced by the SHRM Foundation?Thanks for highlighting those. What’s great about the Effective Practice Guidelines (or ‘EPGs’ as we call them) is that they provide a quick overview of each topic along with practical, specific guidelines for success—and it’s all based on solid research. We create these in an easy-to-use format that really works well for busy HR professionals.In addition to our EPGs, we also publish shorter executive briefings— which are great to share with other leaders and line managers in your organization—and a series of educational DVDs that show strategic HR in action. We’re proud to report that, in addition to workplaces, these resources are now used in hundreds of college classrooms as well. And excerpts from the EPGs are often included in HR textbooks.This year, the SHRM Foundation provided awards to individuals who have never attended the annual conference before. And the SHRM Foundation provides other types of scholarships, awards and research grants to professionals. How can someone learn more about these programs?[Beth] Easy! Visit our website at shrmfoundation.org and select ‘Scholarships & Awards’ from the top menu. This provides an overview of the different awards available to each group: SHRM members, students/advisors and researchers. The ‘overview’ page provides a brief description of each award along with the application deadline. Click on any award for more information and to access the online application. For information about research grants, choose the ‘Research’ tab at the top of the page.How is the work of the SHRM Foundation funded?[Beth] The SHRM Foundation funds its work with gifts from individuals, companies, organizations, sponsors, SHRM chapters and SHRM state councils. In 2013 and 2014, the Foundation’s annual campaign raised more than $1 million. Because of the generous financial and in-kind support received from SHRM to cover operating expenses, all other funds raised through the annual campaign go directly into programs, including scholarships, educational products, research and thought leadership. To read more on HR Bartender Blog, please click here.last_img read more

REAMDE: A Review

first_img12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… Tags:#Book Reviews#NYT#web 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App Related Posts 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnoutcenter_img curt hopkins Neal Stephenson’s latest novel, “REAMDE,” brings black hat hackers, MMORPG gamers, virtual gold miners, Russian organized crime figures, dope smugglers and the flotsam of post-Cold War intelligence organizations into a super freaky all-night disco dance party, evocative, in terms of its well-orchestrated spectacle and cast-of-thousands, of Cecille B. Demille (or Shakespeare). Stephenson is well known for two rather different milieu: near-future tech-heavy worlds that could be short-handed as cyberpunk and the 16th century European and Near Eastern world of his Baroque Cycle, with the Cryptonomicon and Anathem as bridges between the two. The excellent REAMDE is different. It’s about a very recognizable here and now. What makes this 1,000-page doorstop of a book a success, though less of one than many of his books (and more than others) is not the inside-out understanding of current technology or of gaming and of virtual currency (currency has been an interest of Stephenson’s since the Baroque Cycle), but the characters. The characters are well developed, fully-fleshed and very likable (and hateable). Csonger, the Hungarian hacker working for Russian mobsters; Richard, the former dope smuggler who launched a hugely popular game in the vein of World of Warcraft; Sokalov, the former Russian spetsnaz soldier-turned-bodyguard; Olivia the Chinese-British M16 agent, Zula, the Somali refugee-turned Iowa farm girl, Marlon the Chinese hacker – and the list truly does go on and on – are all either interesting or likable, often both. Outlining the plot of a 1,000-page novel in any detail would be ludicrously reductive. Let’s just say that Richard’s niece Zula is kidnapped to hack the solution to the eponymous virus engineered by Marlon that is holding a Russian mob boss’s files hostage and the subsequent journey moves from the Pacific Northwest to southern China to the Philipines and back to the U.S. Pace, character, connection to a world the reader can empathize with, color and wonder, the story has all of these things. REAMDE does not have the heft of some of his novels. It is, in fact, a spy caper in contemporary tech clothing. Post-ending, you wind up cocking your head at recollections of certain elements and events. But my overall take: it’s an easy, compelling read. And in a world of small beer, his willingness, even in what amounts to a cockeyed spy novel, to tackle such a complex story in such a global context is whiskey.The technological aspects of the book are interesting to those of us who are already interested in such things. To a non-tech reader, they would read through them. Either way, they are fuel for the human story. Long ago I figured out that every news story I wrote was simply this: people, in places, doing things. In REAMDE, there are a lot of empathetic (and repugnant) people, in a James Bond-level of (regardless of where you’re from) exotic places doing a lush lot of things (including tech things). Stephenson photo by Jean Baptiste 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex…last_img read more

How Starbucks Could Take Wireless Charging Mainstream

first_imgTags:#A4WP#Daniel Schreiber#Humavox#Matthew Guiste#Omri Lachman#Ossia#powermat#qi#Reinier H.M. van der Lee#Rezence#starbucks#wireless charging#WPC Related Posts adriana lee The components were designed to fit inside one of the smallest consumer devices imaginable, so it’s not tough to see those tiny receivers embedded inside the compact casings of wearable gadgets, one of Humavox’s target areas. Another startup, Ossia, believes charging should work entirely over the air.  Though a bit slower than traditional charging, Ossia’s Cota technology can supposedly transmit power safely over a distance. It has been tested at 16 feet, and the company claims it can work up to 30 feet. Ossia has been making motions toward the smart home industry, hoping to power battery-operated sensors and other gizmos. In the controlled setting of a retail environment, Cota devices could theoretically start charging your devices the moment you walk in. But that scenario will probably take a lot of convincing to appease public concerns over safety. If these emerging companies succeed, or the leading troika of wireless charging proponents get their act together, they could banish the drudgery of plugging in cables and power adapters once and for all. We’re not there yet. But Starbucks and Powermat took a big step toward that future. And until it gets here, at least now we can sip our lattes and charge on a table while we wait. Starbucks coffee photo (cropped) courtesy of Starbucks; Ossia photo courtesy of Ossia; all others by Adriana Lee for ReadWrite Offering a shot of one-stop convenience, Starbucks began its roll-out of free Powermat wireless charging last week. The Seattle, Wash.–based coffee purveyor equipped roughly 200 stores in San Francisco with the technology, ahead of a nationwide launch next year.I stopped by a location in Levi Plaza to check out the system and see if it lives up to the promise. There could be no in-between: It would either be a cool new convenience or a lame, over-hyped feature. See also: How To Boost Your Phone’s Battery LifeAs I sat in the cafe, with my phone resting on the table that piped juice to it, the answer was clear. Starbucks should consider extra security; Frapuccino-fueled patrons are destined to jockey for a seat at one of these tables. After years of trying, wireless charging could finally be on the verge of going mainstream in a big, caffeinated way. Getting Juiced Up At StarbucksWireless charging seems like a misnomer. People who have bought Powermat and similar products know that the main charging mat connects to a wall outlet with a cable. But it’s still considered “wireless” because phones, handheld gaming machines and other devices can power up just by sitting on top of it. At Starbucks, the mats (or “Powermat Spots”) are built into some of the tables and countertops. Despite reports to the contrary, Daniel Schreiber, president of Powermat Technologies, claims the charging speed rivals cabled connections. I gave it a try, and found the charging action to be pretty speedy.  The downside is that few phones support Powermat charging out of the box. Some Lumia phones have it built in, and compatible backplates, phone cases, batteries and small Power Ring attachments are available under the joint Duracell-Powermat brand. The system offers some backward compatibility—if you have one, even an older unit, you’ll be able to charge your device on Starbucks’ tables. If not, you can still use the Starbucks charging surfaces. The store loans out Power Rings for free on the spot and sells them there too for about $10, if you’d like to own one. Duracell-Powermat also sells them online. “You’ve got to have a complete system,” said Matthew Guiste, Starbucks’ vice president of in-store digital. “No one has taken the plunge, [but] we want to start giving manufacturers a reason to put it in their phones.” The retailer has a habit of pushing technologies into the mainstream. Back in 2001, the business proselytized Wi-Fi, being among the first to offer it for free. The chain’s knack for popularizing tech was the main reason Powermat partnered with it. “Wi-Fi was not a known commodity then,” said Schreiber. “They’re in a place to educate consumers.” Daniel Schreiber, president of Powermat Technologies, at Starbucks wireless charging roll-outEducation is needed. Wireless charging has been around for quite a while, but despite that, it still hasn’t managed to gain traction with consumers yet. Why Isn’t Wireless Charging A Thing Yet?Even though the electromagnetic technology behind wireless charging goes back a century, people still mess with cables and power adapters—now more than ever. See also: If The Future’s Battery-Powered, We’re ScrewedPoor battery life forces the hassle. Today, huge phones with larger batteries and power-saving tactics, like Android’s Project Volta, try to prolong the longevity of our devices, but these are workarounds for batteries that just can’t keep pace with advancements in mobile technology. Processing power, new features and our demanding requirements for connectivity make us “more dependent on our devices,” said Schreiber. “[But] it’s reached a crisis point where the industry is bringing us new uses that we routinely disable to give us more battery life.” The issue becomes worse with wearables, as tiny gadgets leave little space for big power cells. Some reports say the system won’t work with iPhones. Don’t believe everything you read. Wireless charging’s convenience can help ease the pain of short battery life. Unfortunately, like the old video rivalry between VHS and BetaMax, warring factions within the industry prevent a universal standard from paving the way for wider adoption.Earlier this year, two of the leading power consortiums—Powermat’s Power Matters Alliance (PMA) and the Alliance for Wireless Power (A4WP)—made some headway by joining forces. Reinier H.M. van der Lee, director of product marketing at Broadcom, a key member of A4WP, told me then that it would lead to “dual-mode receivers,” or gadgets that support both PMA’s open standard and A4WP’s Rezence standard. But the deal left out a third, the Wireless Power Consortium’s Qi—currently the most popular wireless charging option available in mobile devices. Devices like Samsung’s Galaxy, Motorola’s Droid and some Lumia phones offer built-in support. All three standards essentially rely on the same technology. Coils (in mats) create electromagnetic fields that transmit electricity when receivers (in gadgets and accessories) sit on top. But their approaches vary, and none work directly with either of the others. Rezence devices don’t exist as consumer products yet, but even if they did, single-mode products wouldn’t work on Starbucks’ Powermat charging tables. (They’d have to be dual-mode.) Qi gadgets, the most prevalent so far, won’t directly work either. To cut through the complications, Starbucks and Powermat made a smart move: Those free Power Ring loaners come in a choice of micro-USB or Apple’s lightning port. This cross-compatibility should cover most smartphones, and their in-store availability means people won’t have to plan ahead. This simple decision gives every customer some wireless charging powers. It just so happens to spread the gospel of Powermat to a massive audience as well.  Powermat’s Power Play After starting out with test roll-outs in select stores in Boston and San Jose, Starbucks is ready to go all in with PMA now. Guiste calls Powermat “the perfect partner,” thanks to its focus on commercial installations and managed support. “What we got is not just a standard,” he said. “We got launch partners and a managed network that can tell us what’s going on, down to the location and the [specific] spot at that location.”What Powermat got is a direct line to the vast market of coffee drinkers across the country. (Starbucks serves more than 5 million customers per day.) While obviously beneficial to Powermat, the strategy could also raise the profile of wireless charging overall, giving the whole industry a boost. It may even compel the various camps to work together on a universal standard. If so, it couldn’t come too soon. The already complex landscape of wireless charging could get even more complicated before long. As cable-free power-ups work to establish themselves in the mainstream, fringe candidates have been trying to push it in new directions. Startups like Humavox and Ossia want to ditch the mat entirely, using radio frequency technology to transform charging into Wi-Fi-like affairs. It’s All Up In The Air Humavox CEO Omri Lachman explained the design strategy behind his Eterna charging platform to me earlier this year: Users don’t use mats, he said. Instead, they toss their devices in a box. Those devices can vary, not just in variety, but size. With more than a little showmanship, he told me his company “didn’t start off with these devices,” holding up a smartphone. “We started with these,” he said, pointing to a small in-ear canal hearing aid.  What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

We had enough of BCCI, we took correct decision: Sahara Group chief Subroto Roy

first_imgSahara Group on Saturday defended its decision to snap sponsorship ties with the BCCI and withdraw from the IPL, saying the relationship between the two has become so strained that it could not be possible to continue any longer.”The decision we took to end ties was not a bad one at all. We had enough of it. Any relationship does not break on one single issue only. We had a long relationship. It has to do with many issues and has happened continuously,” Sahara Group chief Subroto Roy told a press conference in Mumbai.”There were so many genuine things we had but they (BCCI) did not give heed to such a small thing like opening the bid. They did not open the bid (when Sahara had submitted its bid for the first time). Rules were broken for other teams but we were not given natural justice,” he said.Roy said Sahara had approached the BCCI to settle the issues through arbitration and it had even proposed an arbitrator but the Cricket Board was not interested.”We even approached the BCCI for arbitration and even proposed the name of the arbitrator,” said Roy.He said considering the number of matches reduced from the originally-proposed 94, Pune Warriors paid 25 per cent more money to the Cricket Board for owning the franchisee.”It was 94 matches calculation, the gate money to collection of advertisement money would have been 25 per cent more. We have paid 25 per cent more. Differential amount is 25 per cent of the total amount,” he said.Roy said he would not want to blame anybody but he was snapping ties with the BCCI and pulling out Pune Warriors from the IPL as it involved emotional issues.”Again without blaming anybody, I thought it would give us lot of happiness. It involved emotional issues. Let us put all this money in sports development in villages.”advertisementlast_img read more

9 months agoChelsea make €25M contract offer to Cagliari midfielder Nicolo Barella

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Chelsea make €25M contract offer to Cagliari midfielder Nicolo Barellaby Carlos Volcano9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea have offered Cagliari midfielder Nicolo Barella a massive contract package to move to London this month.TMW says a five-year deal worth €5m-a-season has been tabled to the Italy U21 international.Chelsea have also offered Cagliari a massive €55m for the Sardinians to sell.Barella is a specific request of Blues boss Maurizio Sarri, while his No2 Gianfranco Zola has been on the phone to the player regularly about life at Cobham.However, the player is still to be convinced about leaving for abroad at this stage in his career. last_img read more

a month ago​Pochettino has no problems with Tottenham fans criticism

first_img​Pochettino has no problems with Tottenham fans criticismby Ian Ferrisa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveTottenham manager Mauricio Pochettino says “the fans are right to criticise” after their poor start to the season.Spurs have eight points from six Premier League matches and were knocked out of the Carabao Cup by League Two Colchester United on Tuesday.Tottenham reached the Champions League final and finished fourth in the league last season.”If we don’t get the results that people expect, we need to accept the criticism,” said Pochettino”For nearly five years it was all praise for Tottenham. Now, if we deserve to be criticised, we need to accept that.”Sometimes critics can make you realise you need to wake up,” said Argentine Pochettino.”Damage has happened that we need to fix. We are, at the moment, fixing problems to try to be better and get the results we expect.”We’re not so far away. Our performances are not as bad as the feeling creates. I’m sure that we are going to start to win games, but we need to find the solution.” TagsPremiership NewsAbout the authorIan FerrisShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

More Protection for Consumers

first_imgJamaicans can look forward to more satisfactory redress for breaches of their consumer rights, when the Consumer Protection Tribunal comes into being in July.Minister of Industry, Investment and Commerce, Hon. Anthony Hylton, says the tribunal has become necessary, as when complaints are made to the Consumer Affairs Commission (CAC), investigations are carried out, but the agency’s ability to impose a remedy is limited.“This has proven to be frustrating for the consumer, who having had his or her rights breached, found that there was very little in the way of remedy, unless it rose to a level of significance that would attract the attention of the Fair Trading Commission, and of course that involved, in many instances, litigation. It was important to find a balance between the outright legal system and the purely advocacy role that the CAC plays,” he explained.In light of this, the Minister said changes were made to the Consumer Protection Act to establish a tribunal, which provides the possibility of remedies for breaches of consumer rights.The Minister was speaking on Wednesday, May 15, at a Jamaica House press briefing, which was hosted at the Office of the Prime Minister, by Information Minister, Senator the Hon. Sandrea Falconer.Mr. Hylton said that as a quasi judicial body, the tribunal will provide outcomes, and decisions will be made in a more formal setting.“So, it will have the look and feel of a judicial proceeding, but the rules will be different – more in the nature of an administrative hearing,” he elaborated.Meanwhile, the CAC is to be relocated from Old Hope Road to the Half-Way Tree area, which the Minister said will be more easily accessible for citizens.There will also be structural changes, such as expansion of the role of consumer advocates, allowing for information to be gleaned on a wider scale. “One way to achieve that in this period of constraint, is to look at a role for the citizen advocate,” he said. Currently, this activity is carried out by CAC staff.Contact: Alphea Saunderslast_img read more

Supernanny Jo Frost Joins UN Foundation To Advocate For Global Vaccines‏

first_imgThe United Nations Foundation has announced Jo Frost, best-selling author and global parenting expert, best known for her long running international television series – Supernanny, Jo Frost; Family Matters, Family SOS and Extreme Parental Guidance – will join the Shot@Life campaign to advocate on behalf of global childhood vaccines.“My work in the parental arena has given me the smiles, the laughs, and the excitement as well as the privilege to be a part of so many firsts in a child’s life,” said Jo Frost. “From crawling, talking, dropping off at school, birthdays and their first injections- childhood vaccinations are a rite of passage for most of us, but for some that is not the case. As millions of children globally die every year from a vaccine preventable disease. With just a small change we can make a huge impact.”Frost recently released her seventh book, “Jo Frost’s Toddler Rules: Your 5-Step Guide to Shaping Proper Behavior” to help parents identify and understand tame tantrums and prevent the challenges parents are faced with every day in a toddlers life. As a Global Advocate for Shot@Life, Frost will engage with key influencers in public policy, support fundraising efforts and raise awareness about the need for life-saving childhood vaccines in developing countries. Frost began her work by recently rallying Shot@Life volunteers via video message at the annual Shot@Life Champion Summit in Washington, D.C.“We are so thrilled to have Jo Frost join the United Nations Foundation and our Shot@Life team,” said Devi Thomas, Director of the Shot@Life campaign. “She has a natural gift for connecting with children and parents. We look forward to many events and opportunities with Jo to raise awareness for this issue and help children around the globe gain access to the life-saving vaccines they so desperately need.”Every 20 seconds around the world a child dies from a vaccine preventable disease like measles or pneumonia. The UN Foundation’s Shot@Life campaign helps further the work of the United Nations to expand access to these life-saving vaccines. To learn more about the Shot@Life campaign visit www.shotatlife.org.last_img read more

PRRD expands landslide evacuation order to islands south of Old Fort

first_imgThis area is considered to be at risk with respect to public safety and it is recommended that no access be allowed.The PRRD added that once the LiDAR analysis has been completed, a more thorough understanding of the size of the slide and potential risk area will be available.The Regional District added that a team of experts from Westrek Geotechnical and the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development are working on the analysis and will provide an update as soon as possible. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Peace River Regional District has once again expanded the area under an evacuation order because of the landslide near the community of Old Fort, though this time the order is for areas south of the community.The PRRD said that the expansion of the evacuation order to include the islands south of Old Fort was recommended by Westrek Geotechnical Services, the firm contracted by the Regional District after the landslide first began on September 30th.The main slide is said to have already impacted one of the islands, and recent changes along with new information about the west slide indicate the potential for increased mobilization and depth of failure.last_img read more

Street Banners designed by local artist for the 2020 BC Winter Games

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Local woman, Harriet Stanford designed the new street banners that can be seen on 100th street to commemorate the upcoming 2020 BC Winter Games.When the Fort St. John Community Arts Council put out a call for proposals, Stanford decided to try her hand at designing them with the representation of four different sports, which are displayed in a northern context.  “I’ve always enjoyed creating art, but I’ve never done it professionally,” says Stanford. “Creating these banners gave me a new skill set to work with.” “There are big skies, northern lights, wind and snow. I wanted to pick lesser represented sports and put them firmly in a northern context,” says Stanford. Fort St. John will be host to the BC Winter Games in seven months and welcoming up to 1,200 athletes, 300 coaches and 200 officials to the region. With the economic impact estimated to be approximately $1.6-million for the city. “The Games are an opportunity for us to showcase our community to the province. The Arts Council coming on board with this year’s banner design honouring sport is just one more demonstration of our community pulling together,” says Darren Snider, President of the Fort St. John BC Games Society. “The new street banners are a perfect example of how these major events bring our community together. The Fort St. John Community Arts Council has been instrumental in creating incredible street banners over the years, and this year’s program continues that tradition,” says Mayor Lori Ackerman. Stanford has lived in Fort St. John her whole life, even though she has recently moved away, she still resides in Northern BC and shared she is proud to be from the northern part of the province.last_img read more