Photo library: South Africa at work 15

first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download South Africa at Work contact sheet (1.5MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: Mango-picking at New Dawn farm. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: Mango-picking at New Dawn farm. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: Willie Frost sorting mangoes after fruit picking at New Dawn farm. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: Willie Frost sorting mangoes after fruit picking at New Dawn farm. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: Loading picked mangoes at New Dawn farmPhoto: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: From left, Anna Mathebula, Dahine Mokope, Chepeseyep Thehthe, Florence Moropane and Joyce Mathebula slicing mangoes at New Dawn farm. The mangoes are then washed in a sterilising bath before being packed on trays for drying. The fruit is dried in kilns for 12 and 16 hours depending on the water content. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: From left, Richard Mohlala and Neina Mohlala packing sliced mangoes for drying at New Dawn farm. The fruit is dried in kilns for between 12 and 16 hours depending on the water content. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: A man staffs a phone booth at an informal market on the road to Acornhoek. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: Hawkers at an informal roadside market. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image SOUTH AFRICA AT WORK 15: {loadposition saatwork}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about the image library? Email Janine Erasmus at janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.last_img read more

SHRM’s Best Kept Secret: the SHRM Foundation

first_imgLast question, do I have to be a SHRM member or contribute to the SHRM Foundation to use their complimentary resources?[Beth] No, as a public charity, the SHRM Foundation makes all of its resources available free to the public–both SHRM members and non-members– on its website. Hard copies of the most recent products are also available by request from the Foundation.My thanks to Beth for sharing her knowledge with us. While Beth did point out that the SHRM Foundation resources are free to anyone, keep in mind that they would not be able to create these resources without our support. So if you do find the resources useful, consider making a tax-deductible donation at shrmfoundation.org/donate.I’m always looking for well-prepared information about the future of work. I can tell you from personal experience, the SHRM Foundation creates quality research and information that you can use in your strategic planning, operational goal setting and business meetings.Image courtesy of Sharlyn Lauby The Society for Human Resources Management (SHRM) is my professional association. I support other professional organizations, but my first HR job was as a generalist so SHRM was the first professional association I joined. Every employer I’ve ever worked for supported my membership in SHRM and allowed me to attend SHRM professional development events. They also supported me being a SHRM volunteer leader.It wasn’t until I became a volunteer leader that I learned about the SHRM Foundation. That’s why I think of it as a best kept secret. The SHRM Foundation supports our role as human resources professionals through research, thought-leadership and awards. And frankly, we can all use good information to make our jobs easier. So I reached out to Beth McFarland, CAE to share a little more with you about what the Foundation does to help us in our daily jobs. Beth is the director of foundation programs with the SHRM Foundation and I’ve had the pleasure of working with her for years.Beth, can you share with readers some background about the SHRM Foundation (i.e., what it does, how long it’s been around, etc.)[Beth] The SHRM Foundation was created by SHRM in 1966, so we will be celebrating our 50th anniversary next year. Our main mission is really research and education. We support students and professionals in their lifelong learning by awarding more than $150,000 in education and certification scholarships annually.In addition, we develop educational materials for HR professionals and students, and fund original rigorous research to advance the knowledge base of the HR profession. To help educate HR professionals on the trends impacting the workplace, we introduced a major multi-year thought leadership initiative in 2013.As a special expertise panel member, I know a little about the thought leadership initiative you’re talking about. Tell us more about the project.[Beth] We believe that understanding the fundamental changes impacting the world of work is the first step to preparing for them—and ultimately leveraging them for competitive advantage. That’s why we launched a multi-phase initiative to identify and analyze critical trends likely to affect the workplace in the next 5-10 years. Through a rigorous process of surveys, expert-panel discussions and analysis conducted in partnership with the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), we identified three key themes and have been focusing our program of work on a different theme each year.In 2015, our focus is Engaging and Integrating a Global Workforce. We have released a report, written by the EIU that explains this theme in more detail. Later this year we’ll be releasing infographics and video interviews to help people learn more about this topic. Members of the SHRM expert panels are now working to identify specific ways these trends will impact the workplace and what HR can do now to prepare. Their final report will be released this fall. Visit our Digital Hub to learn more about SHRM Foundation thought leadership.  One of my go-to resources is the “Effective Practice Guidelines” series. Relevant information I can use every day. What other types of “thought leadership” are produced by the SHRM Foundation?Thanks for highlighting those. What’s great about the Effective Practice Guidelines (or ‘EPGs’ as we call them) is that they provide a quick overview of each topic along with practical, specific guidelines for success—and it’s all based on solid research. We create these in an easy-to-use format that really works well for busy HR professionals.In addition to our EPGs, we also publish shorter executive briefings— which are great to share with other leaders and line managers in your organization—and a series of educational DVDs that show strategic HR in action. We’re proud to report that, in addition to workplaces, these resources are now used in hundreds of college classrooms as well. And excerpts from the EPGs are often included in HR textbooks.This year, the SHRM Foundation provided awards to individuals who have never attended the annual conference before. And the SHRM Foundation provides other types of scholarships, awards and research grants to professionals. How can someone learn more about these programs?[Beth] Easy! Visit our website at shrmfoundation.org and select ‘Scholarships & Awards’ from the top menu. This provides an overview of the different awards available to each group: SHRM members, students/advisors and researchers. The ‘overview’ page provides a brief description of each award along with the application deadline. Click on any award for more information and to access the online application. For information about research grants, choose the ‘Research’ tab at the top of the page.How is the work of the SHRM Foundation funded?[Beth] The SHRM Foundation funds its work with gifts from individuals, companies, organizations, sponsors, SHRM chapters and SHRM state councils. In 2013 and 2014, the Foundation’s annual campaign raised more than $1 million. Because of the generous financial and in-kind support received from SHRM to cover operating expenses, all other funds raised through the annual campaign go directly into programs, including scholarships, educational products, research and thought leadership. To read more on HR Bartender Blog, please click here.last_img read more

Can Gowalla’s Disney Deal Help Location Check-Ins go Mainstream?

first_imgWhat it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Tags:#Location#mobile#Op-Ed#web Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces frederic lardinois Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagementcenter_img Location-based social check-in apps were the hot topic earlier this year, but things have markedly cooled down in this segment. Facebook’s Places product threatens all of the smaller competitors like Foursquare and Gowalla, which never quite managed to get mainstream traction. Things have been especially quiet around Gowalla, but the company just announced a major new deal with Disney. Gowalla will now feature locations and newly designed stamps and badges for all of the major Disney Parks in the United States. Can this deal help Gowalla go mainstream?Numbers Can Only Go UpLooking at the latest check-ins from Disney’s park in Anaheim, CA, it’s clear that check-ins at the parks could use a boost and that location-based services still have a long way to go. Only 10 people used Gowalla to check in to the main park in the last 24 hours. Two people checked in at the Pirates of the Caribbean ride – one of the most popular attractions in the park. Compared to Disney’s park in Orlando, FL, these numbers are actually quite high. Only one person checked in to Space Mountain in the last two days.Judging from these numbers, Gowalla can only profit from this partnership, which also includes the sale of actual pins in Disney’s stores across the parks. But by tying its product so closely to these destinations and experiences, chances are that those who encounter Gowalla because of this deal will only think of it in context of this Disney experience and aren’t likely to continue to use it outside of the parks. Also, while collecting badges would be fun for the younger kids in the group, chances are that they are far too preoccupied with everything else that is going on in the parks to worry about checking in. For most adults, these badges aren’t enough to motivate them to check in consistently (especially without coupons and other discounts). Will Disney’s Mainstream Appeal Rub Off on Gowalla?As ZDNet’s Larry Dignan notes, “there’s nothing more mainstream than Disney World. Disney could introduce Gowalla and geolocation services to a much broader population.” While that is true, we have to wonder if the broader population will care about checking in to attractions or if most visitors to Disney’s Parks would rather just enjoy the rides without having to deal with their phones. Related Posts The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

YouTube now counts ‘engagement’ for YouTube for action ads at 10 seconds, not 30

first_imgYouTube now counts ‘engagement’ for YouTube for action ads at 10 seconds, not 30You are here: Related postsLytics now integrates with Google Marketing Platform to enable customer data-informed campaigns14th December 2019The California Consumer Privacy Act goes live in a few short weeks — Are you ready?14th December 2019ML 2019121313th December 2019Global email benchmark report finds email isn’t dead – it’s essential13th December 20192019 benchmark report: brand vs. non-brand traffic in Google Shopping12th December 2019Keep your LinkedIn advertising strategy focused in 202012th December 2019 HomeDigital MarketingYouTube now counts ‘engagement’ for YouTube for action ads at 10 seconds, not 30 YouTube announced it is changing the attribution criteria for TrueView for action video ads. TrueView for action ads are designed for performance advertisers and feature call-to-action banners at the base of the video ads.What’s changing? There are two key attribution points that are changing:YouTube will now count an ‘Engagement’ whenever a user clicks or watches 10 seconds or more of a TrueView for action ad when using maximize conversions or target CPA bidding. That’s a change from 30 seconds.A ‘Conversion’ will be counted, by default, when a user takes action on an ad within 3 days of an ‘Engagement.’ If you want this changed, you will have to ask your Google rep to customize this time frame. That’s a change from 30 days.For users who click your ad, YouTube will still attribute conversions according to the conversion window you have set (the default is 30 days).Why the change? YouTube says it is changing the default attribution window from 30 seconds and 30 days to 10 seconds and 3 days to better reflect “the relationship between video ad exposure and conversions.”Nicky Rettke, YouTube group product manager, wrote, “We conducted large-scale experiments to analyze the incremental conversion volume driven by TrueView for action ads across a broad range of advertiser industries and conversion types.”What it means for advertisers? The shorter engagement-to-conversion window will mean faster ramp up times for target CPA campaigns and more current reporting, says Google.However, advertisers are charged on an engagement basis for TrueView ads. Importantly, this change also means advertisers will be charged after a user watches 10 seconds rather than 30 seconds of your ad. Advertisers will need to monitor their TrueView for action campaigns closely to understand the impact of this change on their budgets and performance.This story first appeared on Search Engine Land. For more on search marketing and SEO, click here.The post YouTube now counts ‘engagement’ for YouTube for action ads at 10 seconds, not 30 appeared first on Marketing Land.From our sponsors: YouTube now counts ‘engagement’ for YouTube for action ads at 10 seconds, not 30 Posted on 16th October 2018Digital Marketing FacebookshareTwittertweetGoogle+sharelast_img read more

Podcast: Race and disease risk and Berlin’s singing nightingales

first_img Noncancerous tumors of the uterus—also known as fibroids—are extremely common in women. One risk factor, according to the scientific literature, is “black race.” But such simplistic categories may actually obscure the real drivers of the disparities in outcomes for women with fibroids, according to this week’s guest. Host Meagan Cantwell speaks with Jada Benn Torres, an associate professor of anthropology at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, about how using interdisciplinary approaches— incorporating both genetic and cultural perspectives—can paint a more complete picture of how race shapes our understanding of diseases and how they are treated.In our monthly books segment, book review editor Valerie Thompson talks with David Rothenberg, author of the book Nightingales in Berlin: Searching for the Perfect Sound, about spending time with birds, whales, and neuroscientists trying to understand the aesthetics of human and animal music.This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Download the transcript (PDF)Listen to previous podcasts.About the Science Podcast[Image: Carlos Delgado/Wikipedia; Matthias Ripp/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook] Carlos Delgado/Wikipedia; Matthias Ripp/Flickr last_img read more