Lion King Petite Cake from Amorette’s

first_imgPhotos: Christina Harrison Share This!Amorette’s Patisserie at Disney Springs has another outstanding addition to its series of petite cakes. This time it’s the Lion King Petite Cake, to celebrate the opening of the new Lion King film in a few days. The cake is layers of vanilla and chocolate chiffon cake with amarula mousse and pineapple jam. The sign next to the cake mentions chocolate-covered potato chips, but there was nothing like that in or on our cake. Oh well.Like all Amorette’s cakes, this was delicious. Moist cake, elegant blend of flavors, gorgeous presentation. Maybe if you weren’t a pineapple person this wouldn’t wow you, but for us it was a lovely, tropical treat.last_img read more

National development is South Africa’s priority

first_img6 May 2015Co-ordinating, monitoring and evaluating the implementation of the National Development Plan (NDP) is at the top of his department’s priorities, according to Jeff Radebe, the planning, monitoring and evaluation minister in the Presidency.The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation was committed to institutionalising long-term planning, building on its five years’ experience since it was established, he said on 5 May before tabling his department’s budget vote.It was pleased with the work it had done so far.Operation PhakisaSince the launch of Operation Phakisa, the first project focusing on the ocean’s economy, key initiatives had been identified to realise the immense potential of the ocean’s economy to contribute to radical economic transformation, Radebe said.“Progress made since the launch of the Ocean’s Economy Operation Phakisa includes commitment of R7-billion of public sector investment in our ports by Transnet Ports Authority, amongst other investments made.”Construction of a new berth in Saldana Bay had been started, and progress could also be seen in the extension of the Mossgas Quay and the refurbishment of the Offshore Supply Base, valued at R9.2-billion of public and private investment.The Department of Trade and Industry had also designated that working vessels must meet a 60% local content target. “The Treasury Instruction Note issued will ensure compliance with this in all tenders,” said the minister.Various aquaculture projects had been launched, he said, that were benefiting many rural communities by enabling them to make a living from the seas and inland fresh water reserves.“Furthermore, the Department of Higher Education and Training has developed skills implementation plans aligned with these initiatives. To this end, the South African International Maritime Institute has been identified as the institution that would facilitate maritime skills development, with the support [of the education department].”Health and miningThe second Operation Phakisa initiative introduced in 2014 focused on improving the quality of services in primary health care, said Radebe. A detailed plan for improving service delivery in public sector clinics in all provinces had been developed and approved by the National Health Council.“We call this the Ideal Clinic initiative. It was undertaken in collaboration with provinces, districts, clinic managers as well as the private sector and non-profit sector,” he said.“Operation Phakisa Labs will also be conducted in the mining and education sectors.” In the former, the focus would be on increasing investment, transforming the sector and improving mineral beneficiation to drive radical economic transformation.In education, the focus would be on an information and communication technology approach to enhancing basic education.National Youth PolicyDeputy Minister Buti Manamela would explain the youth aspects in detail in the Budget Vote Speech, Radebe said. His department has a mandate to mainstream, provide oversight and lead the government’s efforts on youth development.“We have taken a different approach to tackling youth issues and we have gotten rid of [the] government’s approach to youth issues whereby we would ask them what they think, ignore what they say and do as we want, and adopted a new approach of consultation,” Radebe said.Manamela recently held several consultative meetings with youth across the country regarding the National Youth Policy (NYP) 2020. These culminated in the NYP 2020 Consultative Conference in March, which resulted in the inclusion of one more pillar to the four that existed initially.“When we commenced with the consultative process of the NYP 2020, we initially had four pillars of the policy comprising skills and education, economic inclusion and participation, health and well-being of young people, and nation building and social cohesion.“Through the inputs received from the youth through this consultative process that took place, we have included another pillar to form part of the policy, which is building youth machinery for effective delivery and responsiveness.”Inputs from the NYP 2020 conference were being finalised and would be adopted during Youth Month, in June. He said the policy would then guide the drafting of the integrated youth development strategy, which will be the blueprint for radically spearheading youth development against the backdrop of lack of skills and high unemployment.“The [Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation] will monitor the implementation of the policy and its impact. As we finalise the youth policy. we give meaning to it by championing the development of the youth who are future leaders of this country,” Radebe said.“Thus, by prioritising youth development through education, entrepreneurship and job creation, it will be both a tribute to the Freedom Charter as well as to the future of our country.”Source: SAnews.govlast_img read more

Georgia ~ Multiple Taxes: Relief to Hurricane Matthew Victims Updated to Include Additional Counties

first_imgCCH Tax Day ReportThe Georgia Department of Revenue has updated its announcement concerning state tax relief to the victims of Hurricane Matthew to include Brantley, Candler, Emanuel, Evans, Jenkins, Long, Pierce, Tattnall and Toombs counties. (TAXDAY, 2016/10/19, S.2 )The updated news release can be viewed on the department’s website at http://dor.georgia.gov.Press Release, Georgia Department of Revenue, October 26, 2016last_img

A new way to make powerful antibiotics

first_imgAntibiotics have been taking it on the chin lately. Not only has resistance to the medications been growing, but drug companies have been dropping antibiotic research programs because the drugs are difficult and expensive to make. Now, help is on the way. Researchers report today that they’ve found a way to churn out new members of one of the most widely used classes of antibiotics, called macrolides. The work could lead to new weapons against antibiotic-resistant infections, and possibly save millions of lives.Macrolides, drugs that include erythromycin and azithromycin, were first developed in the 1950s. Since then they’ve become a bulwark against bacterial and fungal infections. Chemically, macrolides are giant rings containing 14 to 16 carbon atoms, with one or more sugar appendages dangling off the side. Bacteria synthesize them to fight off their neighbors. Yet bacteria didn’t evolve to make macrolides good drugs in people. So medicinal chemists—the group of researchers who actually build new drugs—start with the natural versions and tweak their bonds one at a time in an effort to make them safer and more effective. But in most cases it’s impossible to confine the changes to just one bond on a large molecule. When multiple bonds react, the result is an unwanted broad mixture of end products, none of which contain just the one specific change desired for making a better drug.  To solve that problem, Harvard University chemist Andrew Myers and colleagues adapted a divide-and-conquer strategy that they had applied to tetracycline antibiotics back in 2005. They started with three basic macrolide ring structures and broke each one down into eight molecular “modules.” They then carefully mapped out reactions needed to put the pieces back together. For two such linkers they even invented new chemical reactions to forge the bonds just so. This allowed them to tinker with the modules individually, and then reassemble them. By repeating the strategy over and over, they forged more than 300 entirely new macrolides.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)When given to a panel of bacterial lab cultures, several of these compounds showed potent antibiotic activity against antibiotic-resistant microbes, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, the team reports online today in Nature. Perhaps equally important, Myers says, is that all the reactions used for the assembly produce high yields of the final products. That’s essential, he notes, because bacteria don’t produce the starting material for the new compounds. So if any of them proves a valuable medicine, chemists will be able to synthesize large quantities of it cheaply from scratch.“This is a great example of beautiful chemistry that will have a tangible societal benefit,” says Phil Baran, a synthetic organic chemist at the Scripps Research Institute in San Diego, California. Myers has set up a company, Macrolide Pharmaceuticals, to commercialize the work.last_img read more