Albacore fishing is best in many years

first_img“We are fishing 90 miles offshore where it is always breezy and there is a swell and these are super big, super hard-pulling fish,” Brizendine said. “Nothing less than 30- to 40-pound brand new mono will do.” The threesome was on the Pacific Dawn and had a fabulous trip. Brad Schlerf (who turns 10 today) caught his first albacore while big brother Ryan Schlerf, 12, caught several 25- to 35-pound albacore. John Graber from Carson called in via satellite phone from the brand new luxury long range boat, the Intrepid, and reported wide-open albacore fishing. “This is unbelievable,” Graber said. “Not only did we catch a ton of these giant albies, but we got to see a great show from a marlin that was caught and released.” ESPN Tournament: Congratulations to 12-year-olds Ingrid Camberos and Suzette Martinez from the Boys & Girls Clubs of the South Bay for winning an ESPN-sponsored fishing tournament in Washington D.C. Hundreds of kids from all over the United States participated, but these two fantastic future anglers finished first in the nation (five fish, 13 pounds, 9 ounces). Family fun: Art Medina of Torrance was in Loreto, Baja California recently with his daughter, Arielle, for a family location. Loreto is located on the Sea of Cortez, the setting for a dream fishing vacation. According to Medina, Arielle took only 15 minutes to land one of many big dorado. “I have never seen schools of so many monster dorado,” Medina said. “We released everything under 20 pounds,” he said. Arielle wasn’t finished there however as she hooked, battled, and triumphed over a striped marlin. The grueling battle lasted for two hours but she never gave up.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! It’s a sight out of a National Geographic TV special. Finback whales, some 90 miles off the coast near the Cortez Bank, are circling schools of anchovies at high speed and rolling the fish into dense tight balls. The whales then turn on their right side to consume the bounty. Competing with the whales from above are flocks of gulls trying to pick off an easy meal as the bait fish are driven to the surface. From beneath the sea, thousands of 25- to over 40-pound albacore and a good quantity of 12- to 20-pound bluefin tuna also take turns feeding on the frightened baitfish. The best albacore bite in many years got even better for San Diego- and L.A./Orange County-based boats. “We have not seen albacore fishing this good on fish this big for many, many years,” said Frank Lo Preste from the Royal Polaris. “The best part about it is that I think the fish will be here through September. There is plenty of bait and conditions are ideal.” There are things you can do to land these big albacore. “I am a firm believer in fluorocarbon leader,” Legend skipper Shawn Trowbridge said. “We have been using the blackwater fluorocarbon leaders and day in and day out, those guys catch more fish.” Prowler skipper Buzz Brizendine admonishes anglers to come with heavy tackle. last_img read more

As Instagram Grows More Complex, Can It Maintain the Love?

first_img4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App Tags:#mobile#Multimedia#news#web 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… marshall kirkpatrickcenter_img 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout Popular iPhone photo sharing app Instagram captured the hearts of nearly five million users this year despite, or perhaps because of, a surprising lack of features. The super-simple photo app let you apply filters and post out to other networks. It didn’t let you do much more than that.The company has slowly added features over recent months and today unveiled a new version of its app with three big new features that could make a big difference in the ways we use Instagram. Those changes are upgraded user biographies, hashtag autocomplete and a new page to view all the photos you’ve clicked “Like” on in the past. Can Instagram keep its clean simplicity while adding more and more features? Time will tell, but these changes look to me like good ones so far. First, user bios now include a URL field and a text field that you can populate with info and a link to another page on the web where Instagram users can learn more about you. That makes sense, as it’s useful to be able to find out who a person is that started following you or Liked one of your photos – but it also removes some of the mystery of the experience. There was something a little intriguing about seeing someone Like your photo, clicking through to their page and still knowing nothing more about them than you could learn from their timeline of dreamy, filtered photos from somewhere in the world. Right: The new Instagram profile pages are beginning to look more and more like some of the company’s competitors’ profile designs.Hashtag autocomplete is something that the Twitter iPhone app has offered for some time and the feature is an attempt to get users to contribute photos and comments to a stream of topical conversation. It is, no doubt, added at least in part so that the commercial partners Instagram hopes to monetize will have some more solid ground in order to monitor their interests. If it catches on, though, it will also likely lead to some very interesting photo-discussions about topics of interest around the world. Especially once Instagram finally launches an app on more affordable Android devices (right now it’s iPhone only) then it could become a service used to capture (and perhaps unfortunately over-filter) a photographic record of history unfolding.The app now stands at an odd place between simplicity and a growing list of features.Finally, the addition of a bookmarked-photos page in the form of a “photos I’ve Liked” view is a good move towards making Instagram feel more permanent and less fleeting. It’s a cool feature for sure. How many of us use this app for quick capture but then make sure to send our best photos to Flickr as well, as that feels more permanent? This new feature adds an increased feeling of permanence to the photo-viewing experience.The whole ethos of Instagram has been about speed, simplicity, lightness, a dreamy haze and a light layer of brief social interactions. There’s still almost no web presence to refer to your photos there, you can’t search for your photos or other peoples’ photos. The app now stands at an odd place between simplicity and a growing list of features. Will that mix serve it and its users well? Will the startup that did so well building a simple social mobile user experience do as well at growing its app up? Time will tell. Related Posts last_img read more

Daily Wrap: Google+ Can Now Go Everywhere and More

first_imgLearn AI in Largest Google+ Hangout Tomorrow Related Posts Here are a few more must read posts, chosen by your fellow community members.Google Chrome Will Sync Multiple Browser Profiles A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Despite The Hype, Few Enterprise Workers Embrace Social Software 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Google+ stretches its wings, giving you more plus all the time. This and more in today’s Daily Wrap.Sometimes it’s difficult to catch every story that hits tech media in a day, so we thought it might be helpful to wrap up some of the most talked about stories. Assuming this goes over well, we’re going to give you a daily recap of what you missed in the ReadWriteWeb Community, including a link to some of the most popular discussions in our offsite communities on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Google Plus as well. This is a new feature at ReadWriteWeb so we covet your feedback. If you have suggestions, please leave them in the comments below or reach out to me directly at robyn at readwriteweb.com.Google+ Can Now Go Everywhere You Go OnlineOfficial Google+ plugins released today add a +1 to your browser and a red notification alert. The same functionality was released for IE users in the Google toolbar. No love for Firefox though.From the comments: ReadWriteWeb Worldwide MeetupMake plans to be at the ReadWriteWeb Worldwide Meetup on November 15. Reach out to our community manager, Robyn Tippins, at robyn at readwriteweb.com if you have any questions. Manage Your Online Social Life All In One Place With MyLife robyn tippinscenter_img UCSD Study: Not Enough Bandwidth for an ‘Internet of Things’ Tags:#community#web It’s Apple’s Sandbox, Developers Just Play In It Smartphone Sweet Spot: Adults 25 – 44 Have Highest Adoption Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting When Developers Can Build Once For All Devices, Users Win Embedded Audio Gets the HTML5 Treatment Thanks to SoundCloudlast_img read more

Sydney Brenner, pioneer of molecular biology, dies at 92

first_img By Jennifer Couzin-FrankelApr. 5, 2019 , 3:50 PM Sydney Brenner, pioneer of molecular biology, dies at 92 Sydney Brenner, the Nobel laureate whose studies on the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans led to seminal discoveries in genetics and developmental biology, died today in Singapore. He was 92 years old.Brenner discovered fundamental steps in how cells use DNA to make the proteins that enable life. He found that sequences of three DNA bases code for the amino acids that form proteins. And he discovered that RNA molecules carry that information to ribosomes, the cellular machines that synthesize proteins.Brenner went on to pioneer another major breakthrough in biology: identifying and developing the transparent worm C. elegans as an ideal animal model; the worm is used today in labs worldwide. His early research on C. elegans and studies in the years that followed led to winning the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2002 with two colleagues, John Sulston and H. Robert Horvitz. The Nobel Committee wrote that the worm research helped identify “key genes regulating organ development and programmed cell death … and [it] shed new light on the pathogenesis of many diseases.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Brenner was born to Jewish émigré parents in South Africa, where his father worked as a cobbler, and he showed an early precocity for science, entering medical school in Johannesburg at age 15. Brenner quickly gravitated to genetics research: He met DNA co-discoverer Francis Crick in 1953, and soon relocated to the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom to work alongside him. As The Guardian said in an obituary, Brenner and Crick “shared an office for 20 years, talking non-stop, laughing uproariously and generating hundreds of ideas, which they tested in the laboratory with their indispensable research assistant Leslie Barnett.”Brenner, who was also known as an adept practical joker, continued to work into his 90s. He was married for almost 60 years; his wife, May, died in 2010. He is survived by three children and a stepson.center_img Andrew Cutraro/Redux Sydney​ Brennerlast_img read more

We had enough of BCCI, we took correct decision: Sahara Group chief Subroto Roy

first_imgSahara Group on Saturday defended its decision to snap sponsorship ties with the BCCI and withdraw from the IPL, saying the relationship between the two has become so strained that it could not be possible to continue any longer.”The decision we took to end ties was not a bad one at all. We had enough of it. Any relationship does not break on one single issue only. We had a long relationship. It has to do with many issues and has happened continuously,” Sahara Group chief Subroto Roy told a press conference in Mumbai.”There were so many genuine things we had but they (BCCI) did not give heed to such a small thing like opening the bid. They did not open the bid (when Sahara had submitted its bid for the first time). Rules were broken for other teams but we were not given natural justice,” he said.Roy said Sahara had approached the BCCI to settle the issues through arbitration and it had even proposed an arbitrator but the Cricket Board was not interested.”We even approached the BCCI for arbitration and even proposed the name of the arbitrator,” said Roy.He said considering the number of matches reduced from the originally-proposed 94, Pune Warriors paid 25 per cent more money to the Cricket Board for owning the franchisee.”It was 94 matches calculation, the gate money to collection of advertisement money would have been 25 per cent more. We have paid 25 per cent more. Differential amount is 25 per cent of the total amount,” he said.Roy said he would not want to blame anybody but he was snapping ties with the BCCI and pulling out Pune Warriors from the IPL as it involved emotional issues.”Again without blaming anybody, I thought it would give us lot of happiness. It involved emotional issues. Let us put all this money in sports development in villages.”advertisementlast_img read more

Debutants’ ball: No less than 315 MPs are first-timers in this Lok Sabha

first_imgFirst-time MPsI don’t know. I have no clue why it happens.” That’s 33-year-old Anupriya Patel’s reply when asked what her advice to PrimeMinister Narendra Modi to curbinflation would be. The first-timeMP from Mirzapur, Uttar Pradesh, has no pretensions of being a politician despite being Apna Dal founder Sone Lal Patel’s,First-time MPsI don’t know. I have no clue why it happens.” That’s 33-year-old Anupriya Patel’s reply when asked what her advice to PrimeMinister Narendra Modi to curbinflation would be. The first-timeMP from Mirzapur, Uttar Pradesh, has no pretensions of being a politician despite being Apna Dal founder Sone Lal Patel’s daughter. Room no. 1401 at Delhi’s Ashok Hotel, where she is staying, is chock-a-block with supporters but that doesn’t stop Anupriya from admitting that she hates being surrounded by people 24×7. “If I become a minister tomorrow, this crowd will swell. I’ll have new-found relatives.” She also admires Samajwadi Party (SP) leader Mulayam Singh Yadav for his ability to remember every party worker’s name and face; this, despite regular tiffs with the government led by his son, Akhilesh Yadav.Apna Dal is a BJP ally but Anupriya says “these people are mad” when asked about Sangh Parivar affiliates Bajrang Dal and Sri Ram Sene. She even claims she is against arranged marriages and supports live-in relationships, even if she herself took the traditional route. The psychology graduate from Delhi’s Lady Shri Ram College, however, has her task cut out as an MP. “My two priorities are setting up a university and a super-specialty hospital. Then I want to provide housing, drinking water and sanitation to tribals in my constituency.”Fresh facesOne of the 315 MPs who have entered the Lok Sabha for the first time in 2014, Anupriya represents a new breed of politicians who are ambitious, goal-oriented and outspoken. From Congress’s Sushmita Dev, who admits to having used money, political patronage and muscle power for electoral success, to Nationalist Congress Party’s Mohammad Faizal, who rubbishes the perception that Modi is anti-Muslim, to Babul Supriyo, who dismisses politician’s white kurtapyjama as mere symbolism, the 16th Lok Sabha’s ‘freshers’ epitomise the young and restless India which believes in performance over posturing.”Today, people demand instant results,” says Lakshadweep MP Faizal, 38, who defeated Hamdullah Sayeed, son of veteran Congress leader P.M. Sayeed. Faizal, an MBA from Calicut University, is already working on a tourism promotion model aimed at generating employment in the 11 islands and plans to invite Prime Minister Narendra Modi to Lakshadweep to showcase its potential.advertisementFor Nizamnagar MP Kalvakuntla Kavitha, 36, daughter of Telangana Rashtra Samithi (TRS) chief K. Chandrasekhar Rao, representing a newborn state brings with it immense responsibility. During campaigning, she had released a personal manifesto for her constituency apart from the party manifesto. “I have to deliver everything I promised,” says the BTech graduate from Hyderabad’s Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University.Daughter of Assam Congress veteran Santosh Mohan Dev, Sushmita, 41, considers politics to be a means and not an end. “I will leave politics the day I feel I have failed in my job,” says the lawyer-turned politician, an alumnus of Miranda House in Delhi.Nearly half of the 60 newcomers under 40 belong to political families. But they aren’t ready to accept that fact as the primary catalyst for their success. “Political patronage perhaps helps in getting a ticket but to earn votes, you must work at the grassroots. I visited all 436 villages in my constituency while others could not touch even 200,” says Dushyant Chautala, 26, the youngest-ever Lok Sabha member.Dynasty never diesThe Indian National Lok Dal MP from Hisar, who is the grandson of former Haryana chief minister Om Prakash Chautala, has scripted a family revival of sorts with his win after his father Ajay Singh Chautala and grandfather were jailed last year on corruption charges. Dushyant points to the other MP from his party, Charanjeet Singh, who won from Sirsa, as an example of a rank outsider making it big in polls. “He doesn’t have a political background. He joined politics at 21 and worked his way up to become an MP at 36.” He finds support from TRS MP from Peddapalli, Suman Balka, 31, an Osmania University student, who was part of the long agitation for the creation of Telangana. “If you work for a cause, opportunities will come your way. I got a ticket for my commitment to the people,” says Balka, who ticked off a security guard in Parliament for asking if he belonged to Andhra Pradesh. “It’s Telangana.”Young bloodAnother dynast, Chirag Paswan, 32, son of Lok Janshakti Party (LJP) chief Ram Vilas Paswan, believes political patronage can at times be a liability. “There are several instances of those with money and patronage being pushed into oblivion,” he says. The BTech dropout decided to join politics in 2011 after seeing immigrants from Bihar “being subjected to humiliation” in Mumbai, where he attempted- without much success-a foray into Bollywood as an actor. He is seen as one of the prime movers behind LJP’s coup in stitching an alliance with BJP and winning all the six Lok Sabha seats it contested-including Jamui, where Chirag defeated Speaker of the Bihar Assembly, Udai Narain Choudhary. BJP’s Nandurbar MP Heena Gavit, 26, a medical student who sat for her MD exams after the polls, says that being the daughter of Vijaykumar Gavit, who represented the constituency four times, certainly helped, but intent, a willingness to work for the poor and dedication were key to her success in unseating ninetime Congress MP Manikrao Gavit by a margin of over 1 lakh votes.Outsiders get a look-inadvertisementOlympic gold medallist shooter Rajyavardhan Singh Rathore, 44, feels joining politics was a natural progression from his military and sports background. The BJP Lok Sabha MP from Jaipur Rural says it’s important for good people to join the nation’s decision-making process. “If we don’t occupy them, others will.” Like Rathore, Priyanka Singh Rawat, who has an MA in political science from Rohilkhand University, Uttar Pradesh, entered politics because she believes educated people can serve society more responsibly and with greater impact. “I always wanted to do something for the country and realised politics is the best platform,” says the 28-year-old BJP MP who beat Congress stalwart P.L. Punia by a margin of more than 2 lakh votes in Barabanki, Uttar Pradesh.Betting on a new startDr. Dharam Vira Gandhi, 62, one of the Aam Aadmi Party’s (AAP) four winning candidates from Punjab, attributes his success to the ability to connect with people. Of three-time MP Preneet Kaur, Union minister in the UPA regime, the Patiala physician says, “She failed to calculate the impact of my ground-level connect with people over the past decade.” Gandhi happily waives his consultation fee for the scores of brick kiln workers and hand-to-mouth farm labourers who queue up each day outside his modest clinic in Sukh Enclave, not far from Kaur’s plush address, the Moti Bagh Palace. He plans to keep working at the Gandhi Heart Clinic: “Parliament works for a maximum of three months each year. The rest will be for my patients and the people.”Most of the newcomers, cutting across party lines, feel that corruption cannot be weeded out by mere legislation. Several even blame the system for forcing politicians to turn corrupt. “The change must come from people and not politicians,” says Sushmita. Dushyant recounts how every village today demands money from politicians to hold various sports tournaments.Kavitha, however, believes that politicians have to play a bigger role in rooting out corruption. “We (TRS) don’t want our state to get into what India as a nation has been suffering for so many years. We as leaders have the responsibility to play the role of watchdogs,” says Kavitha. Sociologist Dipankar Gupta says AAP, despite its poor show at the hustings, has provided and model and structure for good people to join and succeed in politics. “AAP’s success was inspiring. The voter must support a candidate who promises development instead of one who offers free alcohol,” agrees Sushmita.advertisementBJP’s Karnataka MPs, Bhagavanta Khuba, 47, and Pratap Simha, 37, feel their victories represent the change Sushmita wants-both won without big money or political muscle. Now, they hope for a change in the culture of political parties. “Parties operate like the mafia. Most are fiercely clannish. As a result, even the brightest aspirants are kept out of politics,” says Simha, who has a master’s in journalism from Mangalore University.Leading from the frontThe new brigade is determined not to repeat the terrible performance of MPs in the 15th Lok Sabha: Over 74 bills were left pending as the House spent only 13 per cent of the allotted time in legislation, Parliament’s primary mandate. They also hope that uproarious scenes-from members coming to blows to pepper spray being brandished-which typified parliamentary proceedings in recent times are a thing of the past. “It will be our collective responsibility to see that such things don’t happen. We are here to discuss, debate and get our job done,” says Bollywood singer Babul Supriyo, 44, who secured on a BJP ticket from Asansol in West Bengal.Dushyant believes that unlike the last Lok Sabha, it’s not a divided house, so the Government will not face much trouble in passing legislation. “The challenge for the Government is to get the Opposition’s voice heard in the Lok Sabha and ensure bills are not stalled in Rajya Sabha.”Dipankar Gupta plays down the surfeit of young parliamentarians, pointing out that the 1980s saw resurgence of leaders such as Chandra Sekhar but there were no dramatic change to Indian politics. Gupta feels that the performance of first-time MPs, irrespective of party affiliation, will depend on the leadership of Prime Minister Modi. “He must bring in the changes as he has a clear and decisive mandate. The younger politicians will certainly follow. I see no reason why that can not happen,” he says. “I don’t have much hope from those who come from political families. But the selfmade are often the most hard-working.Moreover, MPs from regional parties, despite their language barrier, try to articulate their views more often in Parliament than those from national parties,” says Nani Gopal Mahanta, who teaches political science at Gauhati University.Whether or not these ‘freshers’ usher in a new era in Parliament, what India wants is less talk, more action. “I don’t want to give a bhashan (lecture) on something I don’t know. I would rather focus on something I can do,” says Kavitha, as if on cue. She should. The nation will be watching.Followthe writer on Twitter @KDscribeWith inputs from Santosh Kumar, Asit Jolly, Rajeev P.I., M.G. Arun, Amitabh Srivastava To read more, get your copy of India Today here.last_img read more

Great Eastern Invests in Gas Carrier

first_imgzoom India’s Great Eastern Shipping Company Limited (G E Shipping) has signed a contract to buy a second-hand medium gas carrier of about 35,420 cbm, the company informed.As disclosed, the 1997-built vessel is expected to join the company’s fleet in the second quarter of the 2018 fiscal year.What is more, GE Shipping contracted to buy a 2009-built Long Range 2 product tanker of 105,000 mt DWT which is scheduled for delivery in Q2/Q3 financial year 2017-18.The latest purchase has pushed the company’s fleet to 46 vessels, comprising 30 tankers and 16 dry bulk carriers.These include 12 crude carriers, 16 product tankers, 2 LPG carriers, along with 1 Capesize, 8 Kamsarmax, 7 Supramax bulkers with an average age of 9.76 years aggregating 3.80 million DWT.The investment is being pursued on the heels of the company’s approval of the issue of 1,500 secured bib-convertible debentures of RS. 10 lac each aggregating to RS. 150 crore by way of private placement.last_img read more