Social Media in Africa, Part 3: Democracy

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Mzalendo is an aggregation platform for tracking the actions, activities and communication of Kenya’s Parliament. For people who want to make sure their elected officials are staying on task, it’s invaluable.When Moroccan blogger Mohamed Erraj was jailed for disparaging the government in his online magazine, Hespress, it was through the efforts of other bloggers (like the writers at GlobalVoicesOnline) and people using applications like Twitter that his story made international news. The added pressure of having the whole world paying attention is perhaps what convinced the Moroccan government to let him free where traditionally his actions could have resulted in much harsher punishment.Rethinking AfricaIn conclusion, Africa is producing some very unique and innovative technologies. There’s more to the continent than the things you see on TV – something people, especially in the tech industry, seem to forget. Where most other markets in the world are incredibly saturated, Africa offers the opportunity to start afresh: new ideas and a billion new people to use them. It’s a big place; nearly one billion people and a land mass where the sum is greater than that of China and the United States combined. For social entrepreneurs and investors, the innovation occurring here is a huge sign of progress that could potentially change the continent’s world standing forever. The most exciting aspect for me, however, is the decreased reliance on developmental aid and foreign groups to provide these solutions. The number of African developers who are beginning to create applications that offer solutions for their own communities is increasing and that, more than anything else, will shape the future of Africa.“If Africa is surprising, then you’re not paying enough attention.” Ethan Zuckerman at PICNIC08You can read more articles by Jon Gosier at Appfrica.net.See also:Social Media in Africa, Part 1and Social Media in Africa, Part 2: Mobile Innovations jonathan gosier 1 Traditionally, the greatest power that governments have held over their people has been information. The promise that connectivity brings to Africa is that people are now using that abundance of information for oversight of government and more interaction with administrations. To say that the propagation of internet and mobile connectivity in Africa has been disruptive is an understatement. A number of web and mobile applications are undermining the efforts of dictators and totalitarian governments, allowing them to be more readily be held accountable for their actions. In this post we profile some of them.Democratizing Information Through TechnologyWhen the Ethiopian government instituted an SMS filtering service to censor mobile communication, the developers behind Feedelix responded swiftly. They created their product Feedlix, a java-based client that supports Amharic, Chinese and Hindi characters. The application then uses GPRS, through internet protocols, to mimic SMS and bypass the censoring filter put in place by the government.Sokwanele is a civic action support group campaigning for freedom and democracy in Zimbabwe. Their website includes an ‘election violence map’ that provides detailed information related to localized occurrences of violence related to the election. During the most recent crisis in Zimbabwe, Sokwanele was used to get information out of the country when the government began restricting communication. Tags:#international#web Related Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

YouTube now counts ‘engagement’ for YouTube for action ads at 10 seconds, not 30

first_imgYouTube now counts ‘engagement’ for YouTube for action ads at 10 seconds, not 30You are here: Related postsLytics now integrates with Google Marketing Platform to enable customer data-informed campaigns14th December 2019The California Consumer Privacy Act goes live in a few short weeks — Are you ready?14th December 2019ML 2019121313th December 2019Global email benchmark report finds email isn’t dead – it’s essential13th December 20192019 benchmark report: brand vs. non-brand traffic in Google Shopping12th December 2019Keep your LinkedIn advertising strategy focused in 202012th December 2019 HomeDigital MarketingYouTube now counts ‘engagement’ for YouTube for action ads at 10 seconds, not 30 YouTube announced it is changing the attribution criteria for TrueView for action video ads. TrueView for action ads are designed for performance advertisers and feature call-to-action banners at the base of the video ads.What’s changing? There are two key attribution points that are changing:YouTube will now count an ‘Engagement’ whenever a user clicks or watches 10 seconds or more of a TrueView for action ad when using maximize conversions or target CPA bidding. That’s a change from 30 seconds.A ‘Conversion’ will be counted, by default, when a user takes action on an ad within 3 days of an ‘Engagement.’ If you want this changed, you will have to ask your Google rep to customize this time frame. That’s a change from 30 days.For users who click your ad, YouTube will still attribute conversions according to the conversion window you have set (the default is 30 days).Why the change? YouTube says it is changing the default attribution window from 30 seconds and 30 days to 10 seconds and 3 days to better reflect “the relationship between video ad exposure and conversions.”Nicky Rettke, YouTube group product manager, wrote, “We conducted large-scale experiments to analyze the incremental conversion volume driven by TrueView for action ads across a broad range of advertiser industries and conversion types.”What it means for advertisers? The shorter engagement-to-conversion window will mean faster ramp up times for target CPA campaigns and more current reporting, says Google.However, advertisers are charged on an engagement basis for TrueView ads. Importantly, this change also means advertisers will be charged after a user watches 10 seconds rather than 30 seconds of your ad. Advertisers will need to monitor their TrueView for action campaigns closely to understand the impact of this change on their budgets and performance.This story first appeared on Search Engine Land. For more on search marketing and SEO, click here.The post YouTube now counts ‘engagement’ for YouTube for action ads at 10 seconds, not 30 appeared first on Marketing Land.From our sponsors: YouTube now counts ‘engagement’ for YouTube for action ads at 10 seconds, not 30 Posted on 16th October 2018Digital Marketing FacebookshareTwittertweetGoogle+sharelast_img read more

House bill gives NIH a 3% boost in 2019, to $38.3 billion

first_img House bill gives NIH a 3% boost in 2019, to $38.3 billion By Jocelyn KaiserJun. 14, 2018 , 1:40 PM A draft bill released by a House of Representatives spending panel today would give the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, a $1.25 billion raise in 2019, to $38.3 billion. That is 3% more than this year’s level and $4.1 billion more than President Donald Trump’s administration had requested.Although researchers are welcoming the modest bump, the bill also brings back a proposed ban on research with fetal tissue that alarmed the scientific community last year.The measure from the House Appropriations Committee includes $401 million in new funding for research on Alzheimer’s disease, bringing the total to $2.25 billion. The All of Us personalized medicine study receives a $147 million raise, to $437 million. The cancer moonshot would get a $100 million bump, to $400 million, and the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative would grow by $29 million to $429 million. 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The bill also appears to block a Trump plan to sharply lower the maximum salary that can be paid with an NIH grant. Although Trump’s budget says this would free up funds for research, academic medical centers say they would have to make up the difference. The House bill appears to keep the allowed salary at the current level of $189,600.But as with last year’s spending bill, the subcommittee included language drafted by House Republicans that would ban NIH from funding research with human fetal tissue obtained through an elective abortion. According to the International Society for Stem Cell Research in Skokie, Illinois, this “would roll back decades of consensus in the U.S., irreparably delaying the development of new medical treatments.” Last year, the Senate did not include the ban in its bill but called for a study on other ways to obtain fetal tissue. Neither proposal was part of the final 2018 NIH spending bill.The subcommittee will vote on the bill tomorrow; it will move to the full committee next week when more details will be released. The corresponding Senate panel is expected to take up its version of the bill the following week.last_img read more