AT&T hooks up Biotricity for medical device data work

first_imgHow Myia Health’s Partnership with Mercy Virtua… Biotricity has selected AT&T as its prefered network partner, providing the wireless carrier entry into the medical market.AT&T has a pilot program in place that provides Biotricity with “near real-time connectivity for data transmission.” That will expand to a full program later this year, when Biotricity launches its first wearable.See Also: IoT revenues up 15%; cloud computing a big driverBioflux, the name of the wearable, enables physicians to diagnose cardiovascular and coronary heart disease (CVD and CHD) by monitoring the person for 30 days and sending results back in real-time.Having the system send back data in real-time is important, as it may inform physicians or doctors that the patient is in cardiac distress.Biotricity also plans a new wearableBiotricity also plans to sell Biolife, a personal wearable for people to track heart-rhythm, respiration, calories, temperature, physical activity, and other measurements. Users will receive support from physicians, but its unclear if data will be sent in real-time to a physician.“For medical device manufacturers to successfully enter and establish themselves in the new connected healthcare industry, it is imperative that they look beyond traditional forms of technological innovation,” said Biotricity founder and CEO Waqaas Al-Siddiq. “IoT, for example, would be an avenue for consideration. Medical device manufacturers are uniquely positioned to be successful in this market, as they have a profound understanding of the regulatory process, critical applications, and patient risk.”Biotricity is attempting to hit two surging markets, IoT and personal healthcare, at the same time. It has went through the regulatory process of getting the device approved by the FDA as well, something traditional tech firms like Apple and Fitbit have struggle with in the past.The question now is can Biotricity win over physicians and consumers, the former may be inclined to stick with current methods, the latter may be happy enough with their Fitbit or Apple Watch health services. David Curry Related Posts FDA Extends Collaboration on Living Heart Proje…center_img Tags:#AT&T#biometric#Biotricity#health#Internet of Things#IoT#medical#networking 8 Unusual Ideas for a Dentistry Business Can IoT Bridge The Gaps In Modern Mental Health…last_img read more

New Jersey ~ Corporate, Personal Income Taxes: Failure of a Shareholder Trust to Make New Jersey ESBT Election Did Not Remove S Corporation Status

first_imgCCH Tax Day ReportIn a letter ruling the New Jersey Division of Taxation, Regulatory Services Branch, stated that under the New Jersey gross (personal) income tax an S corporation could have a shareholder that was a trust that did not elect to become a New Jersey Electing Small Business Trust (ESBT) and still not lose its New Jersey S corporation status. The taxpayer would still have to properly file Form CBT-2553, New Jersey S Corporation or New Jersey QSSS Election. Further, the trust would need to file Form NJ-1041, Fiduciary Return, and compute its tax in the same manner as a regular (non-ESBT) trust. The taxpayer was an S corporation for federal income tax purposes. One of its shareholders was a trust that historically had been a grantor trust. However, the trust lost its grantor trust status and then elected to be taxed as an ESBT for federal tax purposes. If the trust had not made the federal ESBT election, the taxpayer would have lost its status as an S corporation for federal income tax purposes because it would have had an ineligible shareholder. A trust can only become an ESBT for New Jersey tax purposes if it affirmatively files a New Jersey ESBT election. In New Jersey, the election to be treated as an ESBT is not a mandatory election. Thus, a federal ESBT is permitted to file Form NJ-1041, Fiduciary Return, when the New Jersey ESBT election has not been made. Further, if the trust did not elect to be a New Jersey ESBT and file Form NJ-1041SB, Fiduciary Return Electing Small Business Trust, the New Jersey S corporation’s status would not be affected by the shareholder’s type of trust.LR: 2016-1-GIT, New Jersey Division of Taxation, September 28, 2016, ¶401-994last_img read more

Court rejects Trump’s appeal in fight over financial records

first_img(AP) — A federal appeals court will not take up President Donald Trump’s appeal of a ruling that his accounting firm must turn over financial records to Congress.The order was handed down Wednesday by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.It is almost certain that Trump will appeal to the Supreme Court.A three-judge appellate panel rejected Trump’s arguments last month after the president’s lawyers went to court to prevent Mazars USA from turning over the records. But Trump petitioned for the full court to reconsider the case.The House Committee on Oversight and Reform subpoenaed records from Mazars in April.They include documents from 2011 to 2018 that the House wants for investigation into the president’s reporting of his finances and potential conflicts of interest.last_img read more

House bill gives NIH a 3% boost in 2019, to $38.3 billion

first_img House bill gives NIH a 3% boost in 2019, to $38.3 billion By Jocelyn KaiserJun. 14, 2018 , 1:40 PM A draft bill released by a House of Representatives spending panel today would give the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, a $1.25 billion raise in 2019, to $38.3 billion. That is 3% more than this year’s level and $4.1 billion more than President Donald Trump’s administration had requested.Although researchers are welcoming the modest bump, the bill also brings back a proposed ban on research with fetal tissue that alarmed the scientific community last year.The measure from the House Appropriations Committee includes $401 million in new funding for research on Alzheimer’s disease, bringing the total to $2.25 billion. The All of Us personalized medicine study receives a $147 million raise, to $437 million. The cancer moonshot would get a $100 million bump, to $400 million, and the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative would grow by $29 million to $429 million. 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The bill also appears to block a Trump plan to sharply lower the maximum salary that can be paid with an NIH grant. Although Trump’s budget says this would free up funds for research, academic medical centers say they would have to make up the difference. The House bill appears to keep the allowed salary at the current level of $189,600.But as with last year’s spending bill, the subcommittee included language drafted by House Republicans that would ban NIH from funding research with human fetal tissue obtained through an elective abortion. According to the International Society for Stem Cell Research in Skokie, Illinois, this “would roll back decades of consensus in the U.S., irreparably delaying the development of new medical treatments.” Last year, the Senate did not include the ban in its bill but called for a study on other ways to obtain fetal tissue. Neither proposal was part of the final 2018 NIH spending bill.The subcommittee will vote on the bill tomorrow; it will move to the full committee next week when more details will be released. The corresponding Senate panel is expected to take up its version of the bill the following week.last_img read more