SA to become electricity-savvy

first_img6 February 2008Empty buildings with all the lights left on and home use of energy-guzzling heating and lighting methods may be a thing of the past, should government’s new energy saving proposals be enacted.These suggestions, as well as the use of solar power in new houses, flats and businesses, among others, are contained in the proposed new energy-saving regulations which are to be included in the Electricity Regulation Act.“The aim of this campaign is to change the behaviour of consumers,” Minerals and Energy Minister Buyelwa Sonjica said at the launch of South Africa’s National Energy Efficiency Campaign on Tuesday.The minister urged South Africans to switch off lights not in use, such as those in offices after working hours – as well as street lights during broad daylight.The new regulations will also promote the use of energy-efficient light bulbs in place of incandescent lights.Sonjica said the campaign, which will cost between R20-million and R40-million, would also look at the demand side management programme, with measures such as solar traffic lights, solar power heaters and creative systems lighting (CSL) set to come into effect soon.Sonjica said Eskom has agreed to make one million solar water heaters available to encourage South Africans to use this alternative source of heating, as opposed to mains powered geysers.“By adhering to the regulations, switching off lights in offices from 10pm to 6am for government buildings, except security lights, we can save about 1 080 megawatts, while working in our offices using daylight instead of electric light can save about 1 200 megawatts,” she said.Sonjica said the regulations would be supported by an electricity rationing framework, to be proposed in due course.The proposed regulations include making use of solar heating panels in both commercial and residential buildings, to be implemented before 2010.New houses, flats and townhouses valued at over R750 000 will be required to install electric geysers which incorporate a solar water heating facility. Residences that exceed 300 square meters will also have to install solar powered geysers.Office blocks, hospitals, hotels and resorts and shopping complexes feeding from a centralised water heating system will also be expected to install solar powered heating systems.All new geysers on the market will have to have insulation blankets which prevent heat from escaping and therefore save energy.It has also been proposed that heating, ventilation and cooling systems in commercial and residential buildings as well as swimming pools be fitted with a facility whereby the supply of electricity can be controlled remotely.The regulations will allow municipalities to pass by-laws, which will be in the interest of energy efficiency.Comments on the regulations must be submitted to the department no later than 25 February 2008.All comments must be addressed to Ompi Aphane and either e-mailed to LF.aphane@dme.gov.za or pm.ngobeni@dme.gov.za or posted to the Department of Minerals and Energy at Private Bag X59, Pretoria, 0001.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Study Predicts Growing Use Of Social Media In Healthcare

first_imgMen are more likely than women to turn to Facebook and other social networks for healthcare purposes, according to a survey by accounting firm PwC.Not surprisingly, the survey of 1,000 adults found that younger people were more likely to use social media than older people for healthcare purposes. Overall, nearly a third of respondents, and 50 percent of those under the age of 35, had used social media for healthcare purposes, which can range from registering a complaint to looking up informational videos on YouTube.The PwC report concluded that social media would continue to be a factor for healthcare providers and consumers, saying that healthcare is “no longer social media’s wallflower.” At the same time, however, ambiguous regulations, privacy concerns and a host of other factors all limit how patients and healthcare providers use social media to make decisions.But once these hurdles are overcome, the PwC report said, social media “will open new opportunities to improve health delivery and outcomes.”Facebook (18 percent) was the most popular site for people searching for healthcare information, followed by YouTube (12 percent) and blogs (nine percent). Related Posts Tags:#health#web Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting dave copeland Yet social media does little to dictate which providers patients choose: just five percent of respondents said they would be swayed to choose one hospital over another because it had a social media presence, compared to the 30 percent who said they would choose a hospital based on its privacy policy.There are still some barriers keeping big swaths of the healthcare industry on the sidelines when it comes to social media, including what the PwC study called “elusive” FDA guidelines that make it difficult for pharmaceutical companies to use the platform to connect with consumers.The survey also touched on privacy and security concerns, noting that half of all healthcare organizations had a privacy or security breach within the past year, and the potential for breaches could increase as more companies utilize cloud computing and look for ways to share information amongst different providers. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more

House bill gives NIH a 3% boost in 2019, to $38.3 billion

first_img House bill gives NIH a 3% boost in 2019, to $38.3 billion By Jocelyn KaiserJun. 14, 2018 , 1:40 PM A draft bill released by a House of Representatives spending panel today would give the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, a $1.25 billion raise in 2019, to $38.3 billion. That is 3% more than this year’s level and $4.1 billion more than President Donald Trump’s administration had requested.Although researchers are welcoming the modest bump, the bill also brings back a proposed ban on research with fetal tissue that alarmed the scientific community last year.The measure from the House Appropriations Committee includes $401 million in new funding for research on Alzheimer’s disease, bringing the total to $2.25 billion. The All of Us personalized medicine study receives a $147 million raise, to $437 million. The cancer moonshot would get a $100 million bump, to $400 million, and the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative would grow by $29 million to $429 million. 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The bill also appears to block a Trump plan to sharply lower the maximum salary that can be paid with an NIH grant. Although Trump’s budget says this would free up funds for research, academic medical centers say they would have to make up the difference. The House bill appears to keep the allowed salary at the current level of $189,600.But as with last year’s spending bill, the subcommittee included language drafted by House Republicans that would ban NIH from funding research with human fetal tissue obtained through an elective abortion. According to the International Society for Stem Cell Research in Skokie, Illinois, this “would roll back decades of consensus in the U.S., irreparably delaying the development of new medical treatments.” Last year, the Senate did not include the ban in its bill but called for a study on other ways to obtain fetal tissue. Neither proposal was part of the final 2018 NIH spending bill.The subcommittee will vote on the bill tomorrow; it will move to the full committee next week when more details will be released. The corresponding Senate panel is expected to take up its version of the bill the following week.last_img read more

Manmohan Singh visits CWG venues, takes stock of preparations

first_imgPrime Minister Manmohan Singh on Sunday visited the Jawaharlal Nehru sports complex here and asked authorities to “redouble their efforts” to quickly complete remaining works as people were expecting a “flawless” opening to the Commonwealth Games.The venues for the Commonwealth Games are yet to be completedTerming the sports complex as “beautiful”, Singh urged the authorities “to redouble their efforts to quickly complete whatever works remained as people were expecting a spectacular and flawless opening to the CWG.”The Prime Minister visited the stadium, the venue of the opening and closing ceremonies of the October games, on Sunday morning.He was shown various facilities there including the playing fields, royal box, stands for spectators, security and other arrangements, PMO officials said.Singh’s visit comes as part of the series of steps he has taken to streamline and expedite the preparations for the October 3-14 mega event which have been rocked by a spate of corruption allegations.The Prime Minister, accompanied by Sports Minister M S Gill and Organising Committee chairman Suresh Kalmadi, went around the stadium and saw for himself the facilities and the work being done.Singh was there at the sports complex for over 20 minutes. Reporters were not allowed inside the venue during the Prime Minister’s visit.Concerned by the delays and the corruption charges, Singh had convened a high-level meeting on August 14 to review the preparations for the Games.A committee of bureaucrats headed by Cabinet Secretary K M Chandrasekhar was formed and given overriding powers by bringing into its ambit the Games Organising Committee that has been tainted following corruption allegations.advertisementObserving that there have been “slippages” in time schedules and deficiencies noticed, Singh had directed that a thorough probe should be held by the ministries concerned into complaints of “procedural and other irregularities” and “those found guilty should face severe and exemplary punishment”.He had instructed that all pending works should be completed in a time-bound manner and decided to visit select venues of the Games in the last week of this month.last_img read more

Mustafizur Rahman left out of report on collision with Mahendra Singh Dhoni

first_imgIt’s debatable whether Mahendra Singh Dhoni’s collision with Bangladesh pacer Mustafizur Rahman was intentional or not. But the fact that on-field umpires Enamul Haque of Bangladesh and Rod Tucker of Australia didn’t even mention the bowler’s role in the official report submitted to the match referee Andy Pycroft raises eye-brows.It is clear that Rahman had no reason to cross over to the other side of the pitch in his follow through because neither was the ball played towards that side, nor the leftarm pacer was bowling round the wicket that he ran into Dhoni as the latter was completing the single.While it is wrong to think that having a Bangladesh umpire on the field helped the debutant’s case, it is learnt that only after India skipper Dhoni explained his version of the whole episode did the match referee go ahead and ask Rahman to explain his side of the story. And it was the bowler himself who accepted that he was also at fault for standing in the way of Dhoni and the return crease.Initially only Dhoni was summoned by the match referee after his collision with Rahman on Thursday night was reported by the on-field umpires. But Dhoni pleaded innocence and explained the whole situation to the match referee and said that it was a case of either banging into partner Suresh Raina or stopping in his track to see the Bangladesh team run him out because Rahman was clearly in line with him. At that moment, Dhoni tried his best to minimise the impact and that is why he had lifted his elbow and had no wrong intention.advertisementThis is when the referee saw sense in what Dhoni was saying in his defense and checked the video footages and decided to get Rahman’s interpretation of the whole scene. And it was Rahman himself who agreed that he was at fault and walked across in his follow through without being aware of his position. He pleaded guilty. In the end, Dhoni was fined 75 per cent of his match fee and Rahman 50 per cent.Explaining the decision, match referee Pycroft said: “Dhoni defended the charge on the basis that the bowler was on the wrong line and realising that he couldn’t avoid the collision, he used his hand and arm to push him away as he went through to ‘minimise the impact’.”However, my assessment was that Dhoni deliberately pushed and shouldered Mustafizur, which was inappropriate. Even if there was a narrow gap between the runner and the bowler, an experienced Dhoni should have tried to avoid the collision. Mustafizur admitted his guilt and accepted the proposed sanction.”last_img read more