Lieutenant Randy Brandt Receives July 2016 Officer of the Month Award

first_imgWashington, DC—The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund has selected Lieutenant Randy Brandt of the San Leandro (CA) Police Department as the recipient of its Officer of the Month Award for July 2016.Located in the nation’s capital, the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund is a nonprofit organization dedicated to honoring the service and sacrifice of America’s law enforcement officers. The Memorial Fund’s Officer of the Month Award Program began in 1996 and recognizes federal, state, and local officers who distinguish themselves through exemplary law enforcement service and devotion to duty.Lieutenant Brandt, along with the other Officer of the Month Award recipients for 2016, will be honored during National Police Week at a special awards ceremony in Washington, DC, in May 2017.- Sponsor – Key FactsLieutenant Brandt says one of his greatest sources of pride through his 19-year law enforcement career is his participation, supervision and management of the SLPD’s SWAT team. Lieutenant Brandt’s dedication led him to create the SWAT Fitness Challenge in 2007, a program established to promote fitness and camaraderie among the local tactical teams through competition and networking. Over the years the Challenge has grown, with more than 40 teams competing in 2015, some coming from as far away as Saskatchewan, Canada.“I brought it together to bring camaraderie and to bring training ideas together and networking,” Lieutenant Brandt said.After a visit in 2014, Lieutenant Brandt decided to honor George Mark Children’s House by making it the beneficiary of the Challenge’s fundraising efforts. The George Mark Children’s House is a pediatric palliative care center in San Leandro, providing hospice and respite care to children, in hopes of reducing the stress on patients and their families.“I was invited [to George Mark] as a motorcycle sergeant because the kids really liked motor cops. So we decided to bring our whole unit up there because we thought it might be a fun day,” Lieutenant Brandt said. “Walking through there we were moved by what we were seeing more than the kids were about seeing us.”Each team is asked to raise at least $500 for the pediatric care center, while Lieutenant Brandt raises funds to cover the cost of the Challenge. In 2014, they raised $25,000, and in 2015, they raised $32,000. The partnership has also garnered extensive media attention for the facility, helping raise its profile in the community. In 2016, the teams raised $96,000.Recently, one of the competitors in the SWAT Fitness Challenge learned that the child of his childhood best friend had passed away at George Mark Children’s House. “That sort of brings it all home. I think it makes it all worthwhile. It’s all beyond us, and it’s more about them. That’s what the event is about,” Lieutenant Brandt said.In addition to the donations, Lieutenant Brandt also facilitated the opportunity for one of the George Mark Children’s House teenage patients to be named an SLPD Honorary Officer, fulfilling a dream for the patient and his family.Supporting Quotes“[Lt.] Brandt has proven time and time again that he is a caring and dedicated individual and professional, who embodies SLPD’s motto of Teamwork, Integrity, Professionalism and Service,” said Ken Sommer, Director of Advancement for George Mark Children’s House.“Undoubtedly, Lieutenant Brandt’s commitment to fitness and wellness are evidenced in his assignment choices and his accomplishments in the SWAT Fitness Challenge,” SLPD Sergeant Troy Young said. “He has a great sense of the importance of the community and the role law enforcement should play in our communities.”“Lieutenant Brandt’s work with George Mark Children’s House is commendable,” Memorial Fund President and CEO Craig W. Floyd said. “Not only is his dedication to the wellness of his fellow officers, but to the children in his community. It’s his life’s work that earns him the July 2016 Officer of the Month Award.”For more information about the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund’s Officer of the Month Award, visit www.LawMemorial.org/OTM. — ### — Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

USS Partners with Mojix to Expand RFID System Offerings

first_imgUSS recently announced the expansion of its electronic article surveillance (EAS) system integration capabilities and offerings to include radio-frequency identification(RFID} technology; made possible through a new partnership with enterprise RFID hardware and software manufacturer and developer,Mojix, Inc.Founded in 2004, California-based Mojix specializes in solution providers and system integrators partnerships to provide customized enterprise RFID system solutions accompanied by trusted installation, integration and maintenance services.USS Chief Technology Officer Robert Simoneau voiced his excitement for the new partnership and technology capabilities, and the possibilities they present for USS’ product development teams.- Sponsor – “This an incredible opportunity for USS to drastically expand our technology and product catalogue,” said Simoneau. “RFID technology is the way of the future,” he continued. “In addition to increasing more-revealing detection and business intelligence, it allows users to make decisions backed by data, resulting in safer and more efficient environments.The MojixViZix™ IoT solution is particularly appealing as it represents a proven middleware platform that is absolutely ready for use by our retail partners.”“By leveraging a partnership with a like-minded, innovation-driven, organization like Mojix, the resulting synergy will meet clients’ unique needs not only now, but well into the future.” Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

REAMDE: A Review

first_img12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… Tags:#Book Reviews#NYT#web 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App Related Posts 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnoutcenter_img curt hopkins Neal Stephenson’s latest novel, “REAMDE,” brings black hat hackers, MMORPG gamers, virtual gold miners, Russian organized crime figures, dope smugglers and the flotsam of post-Cold War intelligence organizations into a super freaky all-night disco dance party, evocative, in terms of its well-orchestrated spectacle and cast-of-thousands, of Cecille B. Demille (or Shakespeare). Stephenson is well known for two rather different milieu: near-future tech-heavy worlds that could be short-handed as cyberpunk and the 16th century European and Near Eastern world of his Baroque Cycle, with the Cryptonomicon and Anathem as bridges between the two. The excellent REAMDE is different. It’s about a very recognizable here and now. What makes this 1,000-page doorstop of a book a success, though less of one than many of his books (and more than others) is not the inside-out understanding of current technology or of gaming and of virtual currency (currency has been an interest of Stephenson’s since the Baroque Cycle), but the characters. The characters are well developed, fully-fleshed and very likable (and hateable). Csonger, the Hungarian hacker working for Russian mobsters; Richard, the former dope smuggler who launched a hugely popular game in the vein of World of Warcraft; Sokalov, the former Russian spetsnaz soldier-turned-bodyguard; Olivia the Chinese-British M16 agent, Zula, the Somali refugee-turned Iowa farm girl, Marlon the Chinese hacker – and the list truly does go on and on – are all either interesting or likable, often both. Outlining the plot of a 1,000-page novel in any detail would be ludicrously reductive. Let’s just say that Richard’s niece Zula is kidnapped to hack the solution to the eponymous virus engineered by Marlon that is holding a Russian mob boss’s files hostage and the subsequent journey moves from the Pacific Northwest to southern China to the Philipines and back to the U.S. Pace, character, connection to a world the reader can empathize with, color and wonder, the story has all of these things. REAMDE does not have the heft of some of his novels. It is, in fact, a spy caper in contemporary tech clothing. Post-ending, you wind up cocking your head at recollections of certain elements and events. But my overall take: it’s an easy, compelling read. And in a world of small beer, his willingness, even in what amounts to a cockeyed spy novel, to tackle such a complex story in such a global context is whiskey.The technological aspects of the book are interesting to those of us who are already interested in such things. To a non-tech reader, they would read through them. Either way, they are fuel for the human story. Long ago I figured out that every news story I wrote was simply this: people, in places, doing things. In REAMDE, there are a lot of empathetic (and repugnant) people, in a James Bond-level of (regardless of where you’re from) exotic places doing a lush lot of things (including tech things). Stephenson photo by Jean Baptiste 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex…last_img read more