Simone Zaza ends unhappy West Ham spell by sealing Valencia loan switch

first_img1 Simone Zaza has cut short his loan spell at West Ham to join Valencia for the rest of the season.The Italy international joined the Hammers on loan from Juventus in the summer, but never found his feet in London, failing to score in 11 appearances in all competitions.With the terms of his loan dictating that the switch would become permanent if he made 14 appearances, he fell out of favour and the deal has now been cancelled, freeing him to join Valencia.“Valencia Club de Futbol have completed the signing of Simone Zaza on loan from Juventus until the end of the season,” a club statement said. “The player passed a medical with the club and signed his contract on Sunday. The agreement will see him becone a Valencia CF player until the conclusion of the 2016/17 campaign, with an option to buy.”The 25-year-old, capped 16 times by Italy, helped Juventus to the Serie A title, Coppa Italia and Italian Supercoppa while in Turin, but is already becoming well-travelled in his career, having also played for Atalanta, Sampdoria, Juve Stabia, Viareggio, Ascoli and Sassuolo. Zaza joined the Hammers on loan from Juventus in the summer last_img read more

National development is South Africa’s priority

first_img6 May 2015Co-ordinating, monitoring and evaluating the implementation of the National Development Plan (NDP) is at the top of his department’s priorities, according to Jeff Radebe, the planning, monitoring and evaluation minister in the Presidency.The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation was committed to institutionalising long-term planning, building on its five years’ experience since it was established, he said on 5 May before tabling his department’s budget vote.It was pleased with the work it had done so far.Operation PhakisaSince the launch of Operation Phakisa, the first project focusing on the ocean’s economy, key initiatives had been identified to realise the immense potential of the ocean’s economy to contribute to radical economic transformation, Radebe said.“Progress made since the launch of the Ocean’s Economy Operation Phakisa includes commitment of R7-billion of public sector investment in our ports by Transnet Ports Authority, amongst other investments made.”Construction of a new berth in Saldana Bay had been started, and progress could also be seen in the extension of the Mossgas Quay and the refurbishment of the Offshore Supply Base, valued at R9.2-billion of public and private investment.The Department of Trade and Industry had also designated that working vessels must meet a 60% local content target. “The Treasury Instruction Note issued will ensure compliance with this in all tenders,” said the minister.Various aquaculture projects had been launched, he said, that were benefiting many rural communities by enabling them to make a living from the seas and inland fresh water reserves.“Furthermore, the Department of Higher Education and Training has developed skills implementation plans aligned with these initiatives. To this end, the South African International Maritime Institute has been identified as the institution that would facilitate maritime skills development, with the support [of the education department].”Health and miningThe second Operation Phakisa initiative introduced in 2014 focused on improving the quality of services in primary health care, said Radebe. A detailed plan for improving service delivery in public sector clinics in all provinces had been developed and approved by the National Health Council.“We call this the Ideal Clinic initiative. It was undertaken in collaboration with provinces, districts, clinic managers as well as the private sector and non-profit sector,” he said.“Operation Phakisa Labs will also be conducted in the mining and education sectors.” In the former, the focus would be on increasing investment, transforming the sector and improving mineral beneficiation to drive radical economic transformation.In education, the focus would be on an information and communication technology approach to enhancing basic education.National Youth PolicyDeputy Minister Buti Manamela would explain the youth aspects in detail in the Budget Vote Speech, Radebe said. His department has a mandate to mainstream, provide oversight and lead the government’s efforts on youth development.“We have taken a different approach to tackling youth issues and we have gotten rid of [the] government’s approach to youth issues whereby we would ask them what they think, ignore what they say and do as we want, and adopted a new approach of consultation,” Radebe said.Manamela recently held several consultative meetings with youth across the country regarding the National Youth Policy (NYP) 2020. These culminated in the NYP 2020 Consultative Conference in March, which resulted in the inclusion of one more pillar to the four that existed initially.“When we commenced with the consultative process of the NYP 2020, we initially had four pillars of the policy comprising skills and education, economic inclusion and participation, health and well-being of young people, and nation building and social cohesion.“Through the inputs received from the youth through this consultative process that took place, we have included another pillar to form part of the policy, which is building youth machinery for effective delivery and responsiveness.”Inputs from the NYP 2020 conference were being finalised and would be adopted during Youth Month, in June. He said the policy would then guide the drafting of the integrated youth development strategy, which will be the blueprint for radically spearheading youth development against the backdrop of lack of skills and high unemployment.“The [Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation] will monitor the implementation of the policy and its impact. As we finalise the youth policy. we give meaning to it by championing the development of the youth who are future leaders of this country,” Radebe said.“Thus, by prioritising youth development through education, entrepreneurship and job creation, it will be both a tribute to the Freedom Charter as well as to the future of our country.”Source: SAnews.govlast_img read more

New Year’s Eve Fireworks Show In Philadelphia

first_img Philly never drops the ball on a good celebration. This year, Philly adds twice the flare again to its New Year’s Eve show with two fireworks shows. Find out here where the best spots are to view the shows. SugarHouse Casino Presents Twice the Fireworks! Twice the Fun! Saturday, December 31 6:00 p.m. and midnight Delaware River Waterfront Insider Tip: This is free.   Top Fireworks Viewing Spots Adventure Aquarium 1 Riverside Drive Have your own under the sea adventure when you ring in the New Year.  Guests can dive into the hors d’oeuvres, food stations and open bar and catch a great view of the fireworks while toasting with champagne. Music and entertainment round out the New Year’s adventure. Insider Tip: $125 per person Battleship New Jersey 62 Battleship Place Get your sea legs ready. Enjoy music, food and bar concessions, as well as a unique view of both fireworks shows at 6 p.m. and midnight. New Year’s fireworks along the Delaware River(G. Widman for GPTMC) Blue Cross RiverRink Columbus Boulevard and Market Street The Blue Cross RiverRink’s New Year’s Eve Party on Ice offers one of the best views of the city’s fireworks show over the Delaware River. Skaters can catch one of two sparkling shows during the early (5-7 p.m.) and late (11 p.m. – 1 a.m.) parties. File this spot under family-friendly. Insider Tip: Tickets are $30 for skaters and $20 for spectators. Franklin Square 200 N. 6th Street Families can head to the brightly illuminated Franklin Square to watch the 6 p.m. fireworks show. From 11a.m. – 4 p.m., there will be party hat decorating, free entertainment, and a “Square-drop” countdown to 6 p.m. File this one under family-friendly. Great Plaza at Penn’s Landing Chestnut Street and Columbus Boulevard Head to the Great Plaza at Penn’s Landing for a front-row view of the fireworks backed by a synchronized soundtrack during the show. Hyatt Regency Philadelphia 201 S. Columbus Boulevard The Hyatt Regency at Penn’s Landing is kicking off the New Year with not one, but two celebrations. Enjoy a delicious New Year’s Eve Family Buffet starting at 4 p.m. Save room for the Dessert Explosion at 5:30 p.m. before the 6 p.m. fireworks show at Penn’s Landing. ($55 for adults, $25 for children 3-12). Starting at 8 p.m., adults can partake in the Starlight Soiree featuring a dinner buffet and wine bar in the Columbus Ballroom followed by drinks and dancing at Keatings River Grill, all leading up to the fireworks spectacular at midnight. ($125 per person) Independence Seaport Museum Columbus Boulevard at Walnut Street Grab a complimentary party hat and noisemaker before heading outside to the second-floor terrace to watch the fireworks spectacular over the Delaware River at 6 p.m. The museum comes alive at 8:30 p.m. during the Buccaneers Ball, a swashbuckler-themed New Year’s Eve celebration with live music, drinks, dinner and dancing ending with the fireworks show at midnight. Penn Treaty Park Delaware Avenue and Beach Street Penn Treaty Park’s seven acres of open green space and clean picnic areas provide a great vantage point from which to watch the fireworks. Race Street Pier Race Street and Delaware Avenue This is an amazing spot to watch but we recommend you get there early, as it’s probably going to fill up fast. Insider Tip: Alcohol, BBQ and glass containers are not permitted at the Pier. Spirit of Philadelphia 401 S. Columbus Boulevard Set sail on the Spirit of Philadelphia for two special sailing adventures to ring in the New Year. Families can hop aboard for the early New Year’s Eve Fireworks Dinner Cruise from 4–6:30 p.m. and celebrate with live music, party favors and a grand buffet before getting an up close view of the fireworks at 6 p.m. From $109.90 per adult. $69.90 per child ages 3-12. The New Year’s celebration sets sails again from 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. with sweeping views of the fireworks and the city skyline; the night includes a dinner buffet, hors d’oeuvres, premium open bar, DJ music, dancing, party favors and a champagne toast. From $164.90 per person. SugarHouse Casino 1001 N. Delaware Avenue We bet that the riverfront walkway at SugarHouse Casino will be a good spot to watch both fireworks displays, as there will be concession stands and speakers playing the synchronized soundtrack for each of the shows. Washington Avenue Green 1301 S. Columbus Boulevard This is another new park on the Delaware River Waterfront, formerly Pier 53. Wiggins Park & Marina Mickle Boulevard at the River Across the river in Camden, you can get an amazing view of the fireworks from Wiggin’s Park, located near Adventure Aquarium and the Battleship New Jersey. Viewers will be treated to a synchronized soundtrack for the fireworks display from speakers at the park.last_img read more

A new way to make powerful antibiotics

first_imgAntibiotics have been taking it on the chin lately. Not only has resistance to the medications been growing, but drug companies have been dropping antibiotic research programs because the drugs are difficult and expensive to make. Now, help is on the way. Researchers report today that they’ve found a way to churn out new members of one of the most widely used classes of antibiotics, called macrolides. The work could lead to new weapons against antibiotic-resistant infections, and possibly save millions of lives.Macrolides, drugs that include erythromycin and azithromycin, were first developed in the 1950s. Since then they’ve become a bulwark against bacterial and fungal infections. Chemically, macrolides are giant rings containing 14 to 16 carbon atoms, with one or more sugar appendages dangling off the side. Bacteria synthesize them to fight off their neighbors. Yet bacteria didn’t evolve to make macrolides good drugs in people. So medicinal chemists—the group of researchers who actually build new drugs—start with the natural versions and tweak their bonds one at a time in an effort to make them safer and more effective. But in most cases it’s impossible to confine the changes to just one bond on a large molecule. When multiple bonds react, the result is an unwanted broad mixture of end products, none of which contain just the one specific change desired for making a better drug.  To solve that problem, Harvard University chemist Andrew Myers and colleagues adapted a divide-and-conquer strategy that they had applied to tetracycline antibiotics back in 2005. They started with three basic macrolide ring structures and broke each one down into eight molecular “modules.” They then carefully mapped out reactions needed to put the pieces back together. For two such linkers they even invented new chemical reactions to forge the bonds just so. This allowed them to tinker with the modules individually, and then reassemble them. By repeating the strategy over and over, they forged more than 300 entirely new macrolides.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)When given to a panel of bacterial lab cultures, several of these compounds showed potent antibiotic activity against antibiotic-resistant microbes, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, the team reports online today in Nature. Perhaps equally important, Myers says, is that all the reactions used for the assembly produce high yields of the final products. That’s essential, he notes, because bacteria don’t produce the starting material for the new compounds. So if any of them proves a valuable medicine, chemists will be able to synthesize large quantities of it cheaply from scratch.“This is a great example of beautiful chemistry that will have a tangible societal benefit,” says Phil Baran, a synthetic organic chemist at the Scripps Research Institute in San Diego, California. Myers has set up a company, Macrolide Pharmaceuticals, to commercialize the work.last_img read more