CPFSA Formalising Mentorship Programme

first_img Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Child Protection and Family Services Agency (CPFSA), Rosalee Gage-Grey, says the agency is currently formalising a mentorship programme, through which young children can be guided by positive role models. “We want to create a culture where every person sees a child as his or her own. By this, we are engaging persons to create a community of protectors; persons who will help to care and protect our children,” Mrs. Gage-Grey added. Story Highlights Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Child Protection and Family Services Agency (CPFSA), Rosalee Gage-Grey, says the agency is currently formalising a mentorship programme, through which young children can be guided by positive role models.Speaking at the launch of Sarah’s Children, an advocacy group formed to protect children and the elderly from abuse, at the Hilton Rose Hall Hotel & Spa in St. James on March 8, Mrs. Gage-Grey said “we will recruit big brothers and sisters who will be matched with our children”.“We want to create a culture where every person sees a child as his or her own. By this, we are engaging persons to create a community of protectors; persons who will help to care and protect our children,” Mrs. Gage-Grey added.The CEO said children must be protected from harm, so if a parent is neglecting his or her child, “your role is to reach out to that parent and give them as much support as possible. If we do this, we would have lessened the chances of a child being exposed to danger”.She noted that last year, the Government launched the Child Development Agency (CDA) Cares, a volunteer programme which “seeks the assistance of the public in mentoring our children”.“We can do this by adopting a home, sponsoring a child or giving service to children in the care of the State. This, we believe, can be the breakthrough in transforming the lives of our children,” Mrs. Gage-Grey said.The CEO noted that persons can assist with transforming the lives of children through the Foster Care programme.“Foster care is a legal process that allows non-biological parents to provide for children in State care in a stable environment, which contributes to their overall development,” Mrs. Gage-Grey said.She further pointed out that children who have been placed in foster care are usually those who have been abused, orphaned, abandoned, neglected or cannot be cared for by their parents or relatives.“We have the short-term foster care, which allows children to be placed temporarily with families while alternative arrangements for accommodation are made,” Mrs. Gage-Grey said.“Then there is the permanent foster care, which provides children with an opportunity to be placed with families on a long-term basis until they are ready for independent living. There is also the kinship fostering, which allows children to be placed with relatives on a long-term or short-term basis,” she added.Mrs. Gage-Grey pointed out that there is a list of criteria to be fulfilled before one can become a foster parent, a prerequisite to ensure that children are not placed in an at-risk situation.“One has to be a responsible adult in good legal standing, who exhibits good parental qualities. That person must also be between the age of 25 and 65 years. However, consideration may be given to persons over 65 years if the individual is a relative of the child,” she explained.The CEO said that it could either be a single individual or a couple, and that placement with a single man is only done if the applicant is related to the child, or in exceptional circumstances.“There must also be evidence of a suitable accommodation for a child, taking into consideration the community on a whole,” Mrs. Gage-Grey said.“The prospective parent must also be gainfully employed or have a steady income to meet the needs of the family. There should also be a willingness to undergo a medical examination,” she added. The CEO said children must be protected from harm, so if a parent is neglecting his or her child, “your role is to reach out to that parent and give them as much support as possible. If we do this, we would have lessened the chances of a child being exposed to danger”. last_img read more

Boost for Female Wards Preparing for CSEC Exams

first_imgStory Highlights Female wards at the Fort Augusta Adult Correctional Centre in Kingston who are preparing for Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) examinations have been given a boost though the donation of eight desktop computers to the facility.Several of the young ladies are slated to sit the Electronic Document Preparation and Management (EDPM) tests on May 7.Four of the computers were provided by the Ministry of National Security and another four by the Stella Maris Church Prison Ministry. They bring to 11, the total number of computers at the facility.State Minister for National Security, Hon. Rudyard Spencer, in his remarks at the handover ceremony at Fort Augusta’s South Camp Road location on Tuesday (May 1) expressed confidence that the Department of Correctional Services (DCS) and the wards will make good use of the equipment.He noted that the donation is in keeping with the Government’s investment in the education and training of inmates as part of the rehabilitation process.“According to (a report) from the Department of Correctional Services (DCS), between 2013 and 2016, 70 per cent of those incarcerated were either illiterate or poor readers upon admission. This situation cannot stand,” he said.“We must ensure that inmates are equipped to make different choices when they leave our institutions. We want you to become contributing members of society. We want and expect that those released become law-abiding and contributing members of our communities,” he added.Commissioner of Corrections, Ina Hunter, said the donation is timely and will improve the young ladies’ chances of success in their exams.She said that the department is committed to enhancing the rehabilitation process.“We recognise the value of technology to equip our inmates with skills and abilities to lead productive lives not only when they are released but also while they are here. Education forms the core of our rehabilitation, and we are always looking at ways to improve the delivery of our programmes,” she said.Kelly*, who is among the wards preparing for the EDPM examination, expressed gratitude for the donation.“This is a subject that covers numerous topics like introduction to computing, ergonomics, and it is similar to Information Technology (IT). It has taught us a lot. There were persons who were not exposed to computers before, and in today’s society, you need to be computer literate, as everything now entails computer skills,” she pointed out.“We are grateful for this tremendous opportunity. We are cognisant of the fact that this is part of the rehabilitation programme and the onus is now on us to do the best that we can, so that when we get back out there, we will be better persons and citizens in our community. Thank you again for making this possible,” she expressed.Coordinator of the Stella Maris Church Prison Ministry, Pat Lewis said the church has remained a committed partner of the DCS since it commenced its prison outreach in June 1999, providing assistance to inmates in the form of monthly care packages, motivational talks and worship. Female wards at the Fort Augusta Adult Correctional Centre in Kingston who are preparing for Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) examinations have been given a boost though the donation of eight desktop computers to the facility. Several of the young ladies are slated to sit the Electronic Document Preparation and Management (EDPM) tests on May 7. State Minister for National Security, Hon. Rudyard Spencer, in his remarks at the handover ceremony at Fort Augusta’s South Camp Road location on Tuesday (May 1) expressed confidence that the Department of Correctional Services (DCS) and the wards will make good use of the equipment.last_img read more