Magical Dining Month Offerings at Paddlefish

first_imgShare This!Magical Dining Month, an Orlando-area event, runs from August 23 to September 30, 2019. At participating restaurants, for $35 per person, you can enjoy a three-course prix-fixe dinner. Although Disney-owned restaurants do not participate in this, many third-party restaurants at the Walt Disney World resort do. One restaurant that is participating this year is Paddlefish at Disney Springs.Here’s what you can find on the Magical Dining Month Menu.Appetizer (choose one)Fried Green Tomatoes (elote, queso fresco, remoulade)Ahi Poke (sweet black soy, yuzu, avocado, cucumber pickle)Clam Chowder (bacon, potatoes, cream)Wedge Salad (iceberg, tomato, red onion, bacon, blue cheese dressing)Main Course (choose one)Catfish (cornmeal crust, edamame-smoked bacon succotash, Creole mustard)Half Chicken (Carolina mop sauce, edamame-smoked bacon succotash)Pork Chops (Asparagus, blue cheese mash, apple cider reduction)Dessert (choose one)Key Lime Pie (graham cracker, torched meringue)Flourless Chocolate Cake (mascarpone, raspberry coulis)NY Style Cheesecake (farm fresh strawberry compote)Bread Pudding (vanilla ice cream, caramel)Have you taken advantage of Magical Dining Month specials in previous years? Excited about what this year has to offer? Let us know in the comments.last_img read more

How Starbucks Could Take Wireless Charging Mainstream

first_imgTags:#A4WP#Daniel Schreiber#Humavox#Matthew Guiste#Omri Lachman#Ossia#powermat#qi#Reinier H.M. van der Lee#Rezence#starbucks#wireless charging#WPC Related Posts adriana lee The components were designed to fit inside one of the smallest consumer devices imaginable, so it’s not tough to see those tiny receivers embedded inside the compact casings of wearable gadgets, one of Humavox’s target areas. Another startup, Ossia, believes charging should work entirely over the air.  Though a bit slower than traditional charging, Ossia’s Cota technology can supposedly transmit power safely over a distance. It has been tested at 16 feet, and the company claims it can work up to 30 feet. Ossia has been making motions toward the smart home industry, hoping to power battery-operated sensors and other gizmos. In the controlled setting of a retail environment, Cota devices could theoretically start charging your devices the moment you walk in. But that scenario will probably take a lot of convincing to appease public concerns over safety. If these emerging companies succeed, or the leading troika of wireless charging proponents get their act together, they could banish the drudgery of plugging in cables and power adapters once and for all. We’re not there yet. But Starbucks and Powermat took a big step toward that future. And until it gets here, at least now we can sip our lattes and charge on a table while we wait. Starbucks coffee photo (cropped) courtesy of Starbucks; Ossia photo courtesy of Ossia; all others by Adriana Lee for ReadWrite Offering a shot of one-stop convenience, Starbucks began its roll-out of free Powermat wireless charging last week. The Seattle, Wash.–based coffee purveyor equipped roughly 200 stores in San Francisco with the technology, ahead of a nationwide launch next year.I stopped by a location in Levi Plaza to check out the system and see if it lives up to the promise. There could be no in-between: It would either be a cool new convenience or a lame, over-hyped feature. See also: How To Boost Your Phone’s Battery LifeAs I sat in the cafe, with my phone resting on the table that piped juice to it, the answer was clear. Starbucks should consider extra security; Frapuccino-fueled patrons are destined to jockey for a seat at one of these tables. After years of trying, wireless charging could finally be on the verge of going mainstream in a big, caffeinated way. Getting Juiced Up At StarbucksWireless charging seems like a misnomer. People who have bought Powermat and similar products know that the main charging mat connects to a wall outlet with a cable. But it’s still considered “wireless” because phones, handheld gaming machines and other devices can power up just by sitting on top of it. At Starbucks, the mats (or “Powermat Spots”) are built into some of the tables and countertops. Despite reports to the contrary, Daniel Schreiber, president of Powermat Technologies, claims the charging speed rivals cabled connections. I gave it a try, and found the charging action to be pretty speedy.  The downside is that few phones support Powermat charging out of the box. Some Lumia phones have it built in, and compatible backplates, phone cases, batteries and small Power Ring attachments are available under the joint Duracell-Powermat brand. The system offers some backward compatibility—if you have one, even an older unit, you’ll be able to charge your device on Starbucks’ tables. If not, you can still use the Starbucks charging surfaces. The store loans out Power Rings for free on the spot and sells them there too for about $10, if you’d like to own one. Duracell-Powermat also sells them online. “You’ve got to have a complete system,” said Matthew Guiste, Starbucks’ vice president of in-store digital. “No one has taken the plunge, [but] we want to start giving manufacturers a reason to put it in their phones.” The retailer has a habit of pushing technologies into the mainstream. Back in 2001, the business proselytized Wi-Fi, being among the first to offer it for free. The chain’s knack for popularizing tech was the main reason Powermat partnered with it. “Wi-Fi was not a known commodity then,” said Schreiber. “They’re in a place to educate consumers.” Daniel Schreiber, president of Powermat Technologies, at Starbucks wireless charging roll-outEducation is needed. Wireless charging has been around for quite a while, but despite that, it still hasn’t managed to gain traction with consumers yet. Why Isn’t Wireless Charging A Thing Yet?Even though the electromagnetic technology behind wireless charging goes back a century, people still mess with cables and power adapters—now more than ever. See also: If The Future’s Battery-Powered, We’re ScrewedPoor battery life forces the hassle. Today, huge phones with larger batteries and power-saving tactics, like Android’s Project Volta, try to prolong the longevity of our devices, but these are workarounds for batteries that just can’t keep pace with advancements in mobile technology. Processing power, new features and our demanding requirements for connectivity make us “more dependent on our devices,” said Schreiber. “[But] it’s reached a crisis point where the industry is bringing us new uses that we routinely disable to give us more battery life.” The issue becomes worse with wearables, as tiny gadgets leave little space for big power cells. Some reports say the system won’t work with iPhones. Don’t believe everything you read. Wireless charging’s convenience can help ease the pain of short battery life. Unfortunately, like the old video rivalry between VHS and BetaMax, warring factions within the industry prevent a universal standard from paving the way for wider adoption.Earlier this year, two of the leading power consortiums—Powermat’s Power Matters Alliance (PMA) and the Alliance for Wireless Power (A4WP)—made some headway by joining forces. Reinier H.M. van der Lee, director of product marketing at Broadcom, a key member of A4WP, told me then that it would lead to “dual-mode receivers,” or gadgets that support both PMA’s open standard and A4WP’s Rezence standard. But the deal left out a third, the Wireless Power Consortium’s Qi—currently the most popular wireless charging option available in mobile devices. Devices like Samsung’s Galaxy, Motorola’s Droid and some Lumia phones offer built-in support. All three standards essentially rely on the same technology. Coils (in mats) create electromagnetic fields that transmit electricity when receivers (in gadgets and accessories) sit on top. But their approaches vary, and none work directly with either of the others. Rezence devices don’t exist as consumer products yet, but even if they did, single-mode products wouldn’t work on Starbucks’ Powermat charging tables. (They’d have to be dual-mode.) Qi gadgets, the most prevalent so far, won’t directly work either. To cut through the complications, Starbucks and Powermat made a smart move: Those free Power Ring loaners come in a choice of micro-USB or Apple’s lightning port. This cross-compatibility should cover most smartphones, and their in-store availability means people won’t have to plan ahead. This simple decision gives every customer some wireless charging powers. It just so happens to spread the gospel of Powermat to a massive audience as well.  Powermat’s Power Play After starting out with test roll-outs in select stores in Boston and San Jose, Starbucks is ready to go all in with PMA now. Guiste calls Powermat “the perfect partner,” thanks to its focus on commercial installations and managed support. “What we got is not just a standard,” he said. “We got launch partners and a managed network that can tell us what’s going on, down to the location and the [specific] spot at that location.”What Powermat got is a direct line to the vast market of coffee drinkers across the country. (Starbucks serves more than 5 million customers per day.) While obviously beneficial to Powermat, the strategy could also raise the profile of wireless charging overall, giving the whole industry a boost. It may even compel the various camps to work together on a universal standard. If so, it couldn’t come too soon. The already complex landscape of wireless charging could get even more complicated before long. As cable-free power-ups work to establish themselves in the mainstream, fringe candidates have been trying to push it in new directions. Startups like Humavox and Ossia want to ditch the mat entirely, using radio frequency technology to transform charging into Wi-Fi-like affairs. It’s All Up In The Air Humavox CEO Omri Lachman explained the design strategy behind his Eterna charging platform to me earlier this year: Users don’t use mats, he said. Instead, they toss their devices in a box. Those devices can vary, not just in variety, but size. With more than a little showmanship, he told me his company “didn’t start off with these devices,” holding up a smartphone. “We started with these,” he said, pointing to a small in-ear canal hearing aid.  What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

Weeden Celebrates

first_imgIf you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers! Weeden skipping up the sideline swinging right hooks in a celebratory motion was my favorite part of Saturday’s game against A&M, and I’m not sure it’s even close…last_img read more

Significant victory for Notley if pipeline goes forward polisci professor

first_imgThe political feud between Alberta and British Columbia over the Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion could spell “advantage” for Rachel Notley.“I think she’s been quite strategic,” Mount Royal University Political Science Professor Lori Williams explained. “Some people, I’m sure, have wondered along the way whether she was taking the best tact, but it looks like what she’s done, up until this point, has made a difference.”Williams admitted the Alberta Premier’s strategy has been authoritative and effective thus far, and should the Kinder Morgan project move into production, triumph could lead to future political success. “Of course, that’s not all due to Rachel Notley’s moves on this,” Williams qualified. “But she’s been an important part of that and, I think, can claim a significant victory in the progress that’s been made on that count. Justin Trudeau, of course, has something to claim there, as well.”United Conservative Party (UCP) leader Jason Kenney previously noted Notley was giving away Alberta’s bargaining leverage, and even quipped, he’d love to play a game of poker with her some time.“With things in limbo, as they are right now, there’s not a lot that he can do to get a lot of attention,” Williams said of the UCP leader.“The person making the decisions, the one who’s engaging in negotiations, the one who’s trying to move this forward, the one who’s in power is Rachel Notley,” she confirmed. “The other thing is that Jason Kenney, for the most part, agrees with most of the moves that have been made by Rachel Notley, up until this point,” the political science professor said, when asked if the expansion project could become an election issue.“A lot’s going to be going on between now and the next election,” she added. “There’ll be lots for Jason Kenney to say about this and other issues.”Albertans next vote for a provincial leader on or before May 31, 2019.last_img read more

Congress dilemma

first_imgBy announcing her own candidature from Rae Bareli, has Sonia Gandhi grounded Priyanka Gandhi quite as abruptly as she had taken off? Or, is it a function of post-Pulwama demoralisation that is causing the leadership to scale down aspirations? Is the Robert Vadra investigation beginning to tell? Pulwama or no Pulwama, my impression is that Congress was never in the fight full throttle. Basically, Congress is all at sea, balancing its self-interest against the larger interest – that of the coalition and the nation. Also Read – A special kind of bondThe Congress President is failing Guru Dronacharya’s fish eye test. Unlike Arjuna who focused on the fisheye, Rahul is scattering his vision. He is not focusing on the only target the coalition had set for itself – the removal of Narendra Modi. Rahul’s cohorts have burdened him with the task of ensuring Congress gains while waging battle with the coalition against Modi. Sonia Gandhi and Priyanka are even more direct: they would go flat out if, at the end of the day, the Prime Ministerial crown were Rahul’s and not someone else’s. Also Read – Insider threat managementCoalition partners would exert every muscle in the regions of their strength for a unified gameplan. But they will not buy into any guarantees for Congress. Balance of forces, after votes have been counted, must determine the next phase. Surely, Congress numbers will matter. But bereft of a coherent leadership, the party is creating confusion by pulling its horses in Uttar Pradesh, Delhi, and West Bengal. It is not focused on the eye of the fish; it is contemplating its navel. Rahul has been as aggressive as he can be on Rafael and “chowkidar chor hai”, the watchman (Modi) is a thief, and so on! But he would be out of character to take on Modi’s gangster vocabulary, snarling at Pakistan to summon up the nation’s blood. Mamata Banerjee, unlike Rahul, can be a street fighter, a fiery Durga when required. She raised issues of security lapse at Pulwama. How did hundreds of kg of RDX reach a misguided 20-year-old in a state saturated with surveillance? Above all, the lies about numbers killed at Balakot. The world media, taken to the spot, has reported zero casualties. Last week party enthusiasts were putting together a meeting at Delhi’s Ram Lila Maidan where all the coalition leaders will raise the issues Mamata has been dwelling on. The platform might provide Priyanka another occasion to jump-start her campaign. Someone at the meeting produced a Washington Post headline: “After Pulwama, The Indian Media Proves It Is The BJP’s Propaganda Machine”. This prompted another suggestion: which party is capable of mobilising “Demonstrations for Truth” outside media establishments? By a singular lack of leadership, is Rahul helping Narendra Modi once again? The state units of the Congress are being allowed to get away with their caprice, provided they throw a ginger fit. Exactly as Sheila Dikshit has done in Delhi. In Congress culture, regional leaders were always cut down to size. Is Sheila Dikshit in the process of reversing the trend? Is she cutting the leadership down to size? Congress will come third in all seven seats, if that indeed is what she wants in Delhi. Is she piqued that AAP has fielded its strongest candidate, Atishi, the education whiz kid, from East Delhi which Sheila’s son, Sandeep Dikshit, had been salivating on? Since it is universally accepted by folks in Congress that results in Delhi are not likely to flatter, why is this adventure being permitted? Because Dikshit has been able to persuade Sonia Gandhi, Rahul and Priyanka that for the party to “revive” it cannot afford to be a cypher in the capital city? In brief, defeating Narendra Modi has been deprioritised. Not for the first time, the Congress is thinking “long term”, exactly as it thought in 2013-14. In April 2013, Rahul told the Confederation of Indian Industry that he would first build grassroots democracy in the party. Remember, Election Commissioner K.J. Rao was brought in to set up a system of primaries? The muddled thinking on show today was available then too. The then party General Secretary, Janardan Dwivedi, volunteered the thought just before the 2014 elections that Congress should have occupied the opposition benches after the 2009 elections. What kind of thinking did the statement represent? Since 1991, the Congress had never won more seats than the 209 seats it won in 2009. Why should it then have sat on opposition benches? Because the party had not won an absolute majority. Dwivedi was trying to place a premium on “ahuti” (sacrifice) which he persuaded Rahul was the trick for absolute majority. In other words, had Congress shunned power because it was short of numbers, the electorate would have rewarded the party with an absolute majority in 2014. Full marks for Dwivedi’s electoral anticipation. Congress won 44 seats, a tally so low that it would require courage of a very high order to even dream of meaningful revival. At the moment Congress is neither ekla-chalo, nor wholeheartedly in the coalition, but in between, clearly not the posture of potential victors. If in Delhi it was Sheila Dikshit’s soaring vision to be accommodated, in Kolkata, CPI-M General Secretary Sitaram Yechury’s yen to rediscover Jyoti Basu’s golden period for the Left is being indulged. Mamata Banerjee, focused on the fish-eye, has been quite sporting about the combine. By remaining in play, the Congress may cushion some anti-incumbency vote which may have drifted towards BJP. She is politically sound. The Congress understanding of Mayawati in Uttar Pradesh deserves to be spelt out. “With the Enforcement Directorate constantly hovering over her, there is no certainty on her future behaviour.” By placing its money both ways in three states, Congress may well have forfeited some of its claim, should the cookie crumble the coalition’s way after the vote is counted. (The author is a senior commentator on political and diplomatic affairs. The views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

IndiaUS looking to codevelop small air launch UAVs Pentagon

first_imgWashington DC: India and the US have identified small air launch unmanned aerial vehicles and a lightweight small arms technology project along with aircraft maintenance for defence collaboration, a top Pentagon official has said. The US statement came as defence officials from the two countries held their latest round of Defence Technology and Trade Initiative (DTTI) talks here. The India-US DTTI meeting focused on encouraging the US and Indian industry to work together and develop next-generation technologies. Also Read – US blacklists 28 Chinese entities over abuses in Xinjiang”One project we’re looking at is small air launch UAVs,” US Undersecretary of Defence for Acquisition and Sustainment Ellen Lord told a media roundtable at the Pentagon on Friday. Lord, who co-chaired the meeting along with Secretary of Defence Production Ajay Kumar, said the teams are looking at very specific deliverables on the specific dates with key individuals having responsibility. “Overall, we look at this as a cost efficient, cost effective way to provide additional capability to the war fighter. There are three proposed mission scenarios, humanitarian assistance/disaster relief, cross border operations and cave tunnel inspection,” Lord said. Also Read – Want to bring back US forces engaged in endless wars: TrumpOn the drones, the discussions are mainly between the US Air Force Research Laboratory and India’s Defence Research and Development Organisation. In April, the two sides will write the technical planning document. “We plan to sign that sometimes in September timeframe,” she said, adding that the potential exists to involve the Indian industry in its co-development. The two sides also talked about virtual, augmented mixed reality for aircraft maintenance, which she stressed can deliver very significant potential to the two countries. “What we want to do is take both the US and Indian technology and translate that into a war fighting capability that both the US and the Indians can use. This is very much a collaboration in terms of our governments, our industries and our overall know-how. The beneficiaries will be both the US as well as the Indians,” Lord said. The next meeting will be held in India in September. With some of these systems, whether it be launching UAVs or virtual, augmented mixed reality, they are trying to focus on bolstering capabilities of platforms the two countries can share, she said.last_img read more

YouTube slammed for hosting conspiracy theorist

first_imgSan Francisco: Google-owned video sharing platform YouTube is being heavily criticised for hosting controversial conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, who is banned from several major social networking platforms for his offensive posts, on a two-hour long podcast episode accessible to its 1.8 billion global users. Eight months after being banned from YouTube itself, Jones returned to the platform for Internet-famed Logan Paul’s podcast called “Impaulsive”, where he discussed conspiracy theories and questionable information on sensitive subjects like autism, The Verge reported on Thursday. Now the platform is being accused of being unwise for giving a notorious theorist space in a show which is accessable by impressionable minors as well. “Logan Paul, a YouTube meathead who recently mocked suicide victims and has 18 million teenage subscribers, is hosting far right conspiracy theorist Alex Jones on his podcast today. This is how radicalisation happens online,” free speech activitist, Nathan Bernard wrote on Twitter. While Paul has nearly 19 million subscribers of himself, his podcast “Impaulsive” is subscribed by 1.4 million people. Since YouTube projects to be working hard on combatting the spread of such content on its platform, Jones’ appearance on a famous show has put the video sharing platform in a problematic spot. The episode already managed to gather 330,873 views and 5,599 comments on the platform, however the episode does not come with any context-providing information boxes about the show. “YouTube may have taken action restricting this episode of Paul’s podcast. The episode isn’t running with any ads, the video also doesn’t appear on YouTube’s front page, nor does it appear on its trending section, which means YouTube may have limited its promotional reach,” the report said. By last October, tech majors including Google-owned YouTube, Apple, Facebook, Spotify and Twitter either removed or restricted Jones’ activities on their platforms for promoting hate speech and abusive comments on transgenders, Muslims, immigrants and other sensitive subjects. YouTube along with its community guidelines that do not actually prohibit banned users from appearing on other channels are being roasted on the Internet. This was the second time in a month that Jones was allowed to appear on a popular YouTube personality’s channel, following a four-hour appearance on Joe Rogan’s podcast in February.last_img read more

How The Winter X Games Designs Its Courses

The winter X Games in Aspen1FiveThirtyEight is owned by ESPN, which also runs the X Games. began on Thursday, which means extreme skiers and snowboarders performing tricks that will make your stomach drop, even if you’re just watching from the comfort of your couch. Each year these athletes attempt to jump higher, fly further, spin faster and generally do more ridiculous stunts than they did the year before. And as the competitors progress, the courses they ride have to evolve, too. To deliver the thrills that audiences and athletes want, course designers must find ways to allow riders to go bigger without compromising their safety.Chris Gunnarson is the president of Snow Park Technologies, which for 21 years has been building, among other things, snow features for these games, including jumps from small to massive. I asked Gunnarson to walk me through some of the math involved in building courses for two of winter X Games’ most iconic events: big air and slopestyle. Big air is just one massive, terrifying jump where the goal is for athletes to land the biggest trick they can. Slopestyle is a long run that starts with a relatively level section at the top, where skiers and snowboarders grind and do tricks off rails and boxes, before the course descends rapidly into a series of three increasingly large jumps.As the courses and performances get bigger and more innovative, athletes are continually giving SPT feedback on how the jumps feel and whether they allow the latest tricks. But as important as rider feedback is, Gunnarson bases much of the course design on the cold realities of physics.“A simple ballistics calculator” — like one a hunter might use — “is one tool used to look at what gravity will do to a moving object, like an arrow being shot from a bow,” Gunnarson told me. “The initial angle and speed of the arrow will dictate the distance it will go and the arcing path it will follow.” Similarly, if you know the speed at which the skier or snowboarder hits the jump, how much they weigh and what angle they take off at, you can draw the arc of their trajectory and more or less pinpoint where they will land.The jumps on both the big air and slopestyle courses will have a final launch angle of 32 to 35 degrees, and each landing area has a “sweet spot,” which has a grade of somewhere between 34 and 37 degrees. Given a typical rider’s speed and the angle at which they take off, that slope is the best way to allow them to come down, set the edge of their board or skis, and gradually change the downward momentum they picked up while falling back into forward momentum. If the landing zone is too flat, all that downward force goes directly into the rider’s legs, which may result in more impact than they can handle. If it’s too steep, the rider can’t slow themselves down and regain control.On the slopestyle course, Gunnarson says, the lip of the jump is typically four to eight feet above the top of the landing area, which helps the athletes get more hang time than the ramp alone would give them. The horizontal distance between the lip and the landing area increases with each jump to account for the rider’s ever-increasing speed as they come screaming down the mountain.While these calculations seem simple enough in theory, SPT’s builders must also take into account a number of confounding real-world variables that make the equations much more complicated. The quality of the snow changes how much friction is dragging on the board or skis, making the jump faster or slower, and of course each rider’s mass affects their speed through the air. The way competitors hit the jump matters, too. “One rider might ‘pop’ off the takeoff, thereby increasing their launch angle and potentially increasing their height in the air and the distance they travel,” Gunnarson said. “Another rider might ‘press’” — bend their knees as they take off — “by absorbing the takeoff, thereby decreasing their launch angle, which may also decrease their height in the air and the distance they travel.”These factors can create a tremendous amount of variation in where the rider comes down, which creates a potentially dangerous problem. Even when conditions are ideal, a handful of riders are injured every year simply because they are pushing their limits. (ESPN stated that it does not publicly share event injury statistics.) So building a landing area that helps keep athletes safe is all about putting the sweet spot in a location where riders taking a wide range of trajectories can hit it.SPT has found that for both slopestyle and big air, the sweet spot should begin between 55 and 75 feet from the lip of the jump and should maintain a consistent angle for at least 100 feet before it starts to fade into the normal slope. Essentially, the course designers make it nearly impossible to overshoot the landing, even when riders cover a huge distance — some of the snowboarders in the 2016 big air event flew more than 100 feet.The jumps that course designers build for the X Games are very different from the features you’d typically find at a ski resort. Everything is scaled up and built for elite riders who are constantly redefining what is possible in their sport. And neither the designers nor the athletes could pull it off without the math that determines how the courses can keep up with riders while also keeping them safe. read more

Commentary Forgotten former Buckeye Mike Conley Jr is best Ohio State alum

During the past Ohio State men’s basketball season, a pregame video was played before home games featuring many past Buckeyes, such as Michael Redd, Greg Oden and Evan Turner. One player who was not included was Mike Conley Jr. The former Buckeye point guard was part of a trio, along with Oden and Daequan Cook, who left OSU after one season following the 2007 NCAA Tournament runner-up campaign. Conley was drafted No. 4 by the Memphis Grizzlies in the 2007 NBA draft. Since then, it seems like Conley has been forgotten by Buckeye faithful. Maybe it is because many fans did not agree with his decision to turn pro, particularly after he promised to return following the championship game. Maybe it has something to do with playing for a small-market, perennial lottery team like Memphis. For whatever reason, it never seems to me that Conley gets recognition as a Buckeye legend with others such as Oden and Turner. Now in his fourth season as a professional, the 23-year-old Conley is starting to establish himself as a solid NBA player. After receiving a five-year, $40 million contract extension before this season, Conley set career highs in points, assists and steals. He is one of the leaders of a young Grizzlies team that is contending in the NBA Western Conference playoffs. The Grizzlies entered the postseason as a No. 8 seed and upset the top-seeded San Antonio Spurs in the first round in six games. Memphis is now battling the fourth-seeded Oklahoma City Thunder in the conference semifinals. The series is tied, 2-2. For the postseason, Conley is playing 39.4 minutes and averaging 15.9 points and 6.2 assists per game. Going up against two of the NBA’s top point guards, San Antonio’s Tony Parker and Oklahoma City’s Russell Westbrook, Conley has held his own. Still, Conley is going largely unnoticed. Most basketball analysts and pundits have been raving about the play of forward Zach Randolph and center Marc Gasol, two of Conley’s teammates — and rightfully so. Randolph and Gasol have been putting up gaudy numbers throughout the playoffs. The orchestrator of those performances is Conley. As the point guard, he makes sure the Memphis big men are getting the ball in places and situations where they can take advantage, just like he did with Oden during their time together at OSU. He can take matters into his own hands, as well. During Game 4 against the Thunder on Monday night, Conley made a game-tying 3-pointer with three seconds remaining to send the game into overtime. Remember the 2007 second round game against Xavier? Conley scored 11 points in overtime, single-handedly closing out the game for the Buckeyes when Oden fouled out on the bench. Memphis coach Lionel Hollins understands the importance of Conley to his team. “Mike’s our head,” Hollins told the Memphis Commercial Appeal. “Mike controls the game for us. He’s our director.” With a slew of young talent, the Grizzlies are on the rise and could be a formidable contender in the West for the next several years, and with Conley signed to the long term, he should get plenty more opportunities to showcase his abilities on the big stage. Now showing: Mike Conley, the best OSU player in the NBA right now. read more

Alisson reveals conversation with Coutinho before Liverpool move

first_imgLiverpool goalkeeper Alisson Becker has revealed he spoke to former Liverpool playmaker, Phillipe Coutinho before signing for the club this summer.Alisson who became the most expensive goalkeeper on earth before Chelsea’s move for Kepa Arrizabalaga surpassed his move, has already recorded four clean sheets in the Premier League as the Reds remain top of the league with six victories from six league games so far.The former AS Roma shot-stopper moved to Anfield after this summer’s World Cup but he has revealed he spoke to Coutinho about life in Merseyside before making the move down to Anfield.“He spoke highly of Jurgen [Klopp] and about the players,” said Alisson, according to Metro.Philippe Coutinho, Bayern MunichPhilippe Coutinho faces a late fitness test at Bayern Munich Andrew Smyth – September 12, 2019 Bayern Munich manager Niko Kovac plans to make a late decision on Philippe Coutinho’s availability this weekend after returning from representing Brazil.“He said there is no vanity in the squad but it’s a very ambitious squad with a strong desire to win.”“Coutinho also said he was very happy here with his family, which is really important. ‘Our wives spoke to each other too and they said they had a great time living here, and we are very happy.”Alisson also spoke about the club’s atmosphere prior to their UEFA Champions League game against French Champions Paris Saint-Germain.“The atmosphere I experienced here contributed to my decision to sign,” he continued. “There was also the way the Liverpool team played. It’s not dependent upon one player, it’s a real group effort. It’s a team that plays with love and passion.”last_img read more