Juventus forward Higuain scoring again ahead of Roma match

first_img“I didn’t miss scoring,” Higuain said. “It was an outside problem, but not for me. I was always relaxed and calm.”Higuain, however, has struggled at times since joining Juventus for an Italian-record €90 million ($100 million) after scoring a Serie A record 36 goals for Napoli last season.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliHiguain’s goals have come at the same time as the return from injury of Paulo Dybala. Five of the eight matches before Dybala’s injury were decided by goals from the two Argentines.Dybala came on for the final 20 minutes of the derby against Torino, when the score was still 1-1, and changed the match. View comments As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Buffon also praised Roma captain Francesco Totti. The veteran pair — Totti turned 40 in September and Buffon will be 39 next month — played together many times for Italy and won the World Cup in 2006.“You can’t take anything away from Francesco. He has the same class as when he started playing, in fact I think he’s even better in some aspects,” Buffon said. “He’s an icon for the team and for the city of Rome.” –Daniella Matar/APSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Torino’s head coach Sinisa Mihajlovic, right, with back to camera, hugs Juventus’s head coach Massimiliano Allegri during the Serie A soccer match between Torino and Juventus at Olympic Stadium in Turin, Italy, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016. Fans have barely got their breath back from two pulsating matches in Torino vs. Juventus and Roma vs. AC Milan, and excitement is already building for Saturday’s standout fixture which sees Serie A leader Juventus welcome second-placed Roma. (Photo by ALESSANDRO DI MARCO/ANSA via AP)MILAN — Gonzalo Higuain’s return to form couldn’t have come at a better time.The Juventus forward scored twice in Sunday’s 3-1 win at Torino — after having scored only once in the previous eight matches. And with the league leaders next facing second-place Roma on Saturday, Higuain’s goal-scoring touch will be in demand again.ADVERTISEMENT Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town MOST READ EDITORS’ PICK Senators to proceed with review of VFA We are young Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantinecenter_img Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports 2019 SEA Games to be fanned out in venues, says Ramirez Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Meanwhile, Roma striker Edin Dzeko hasn’t had any problems scoring. The Bosnia and Herzegovina forward has scored 12 goals in Serie A this season — four more than he netted in 31 appearances in his debut campaign, and three more than Higuain.“Both of them know how to play,” Roma midfielder Diego Perotti. “They don’t just sit in the area waiting for the ball. They go in the middle, track back to get the ball. They know how to provide assists. They are two complete footballers, among the best in the world.”Dzeko has also drawn praise from the man tasked with stopping him on Saturday — Juventus goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon.“Right now Dzeko is their most dangerous player,” Buffon said. “He’s slotted into (Roma coach Luciano) Spalletti’s playing system very easily and evidently understands it to perfection, judging by their results.“He probably just needed a bit of time. Dzeko’s past career speaks volumes, just as his current form does.”ADVERTISEMENT Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughterlast_img read more

In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, August 10, 2018

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannon There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments. We’ve collected a few stories that were published this week by other news outlets.Tropical forestsNew aerial images track the continued destruction of the Amazon for gold mining (Wired).Brazil’s environment ministry says it has cut its carbon dioxide emissions to below its 2020 emissions target (Reuters).The life span of captured Asian elephants is shorter than that of elephants born in captivity (University of Turku/Phys.Org).Funding for forest conservation must increase, conservation groups say (Environmental Finance).A World Bank-supported chimpanzee sanctuary in Guinea is now threatened by a World Bank-backed dam project (The Guardian).Fire is a more potent degrader of Amazon forest than logging, new research finds (Pacific Standard).A company building a new dam in Indonesia’s Sumatra Island as part of China’s Belt and Road Initiative insists it won’t cause the extinction of the Tapanuli orangutan, but scientists say the evidence suggests otherwise (National Geographic News, Christian Science Monitor).Opponents of a “new” dam in Malaysian Borneo say it’s the same project they’ve fought against for years because of the communities it will displace and the environmental problems it will cause (The Star).Lemurs use millipedes to treat the symptoms of threadworm infections (The Economist).A look back into our planet’s climate history reveals that the carbon dioxide we’re liable to add to the atmosphere by 2100 could radically change life as we know it (The Atlantic).Brazil has created a zero-extinction alliance to protect the habitat of some 230 species of wildlife (American Bird Conservancy).Women in Guyana lend their knowledge to help address climate change (Demerara Waves).A new study lays out three strategies that seeds employ to survive often hostile tropical environments (Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute/Science Daily).Other newsScientists have created “biological passports” to follow the movements of individual whale sharks (Science Magazine).Authorities confiscated more than 1,100 endangered Indian star tortoises in India on their way to Bangladesh (The Hindu).Right now, it looks like 2018 will be the fourth-hottest year ever recorded (The New York Times).The latest algal bloom in Florida is menacing the state’s wildlife (The New York Times).Trump administration officials must disallow the use of a pesticide harmful to children’s brain development, a court says (Los Angeles Times).The last of the 11 black rhinos moved to Kenya’s Tsavo East National Park in June has died after a lion attack (Capital News, The Daily Mail).California has signed on to a “green financing” pact (Global Climate Summit).Scientists warn of drastically different “hothouse Earth” climate, even if humans do cut carbon emissions (BBC News, New Scientist).The algae that live with corals may have evolved 160 million years ago, much earlier than previously thought (BBC News).Scientists turn up evidence that cities are driving the evolution of some wildlife species (The Guardian).A controversial $444 million grant to the Great Barrier Reef Foundation would force applications for taxpayer money to go through a private organization, critics say (The Guardian).A chronicle of a necropsy on the blue whale, the largest animal that’s ever lived (Hakai Magazine).Sixteen days after her calf’s death, a mother orca is still tending to her baby’s body (BBC News).The ocean’s mammals have lost the gene that protects land-dwelling mammals from the mind-altering effects of a pesticide (University of Pittsburgh/Phys.Org, The New York Times).Is this what the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge might look like with gas and oil drilling? (The New York Times).A corn variety acclimated to low-nitrogen soils could help cut the use of fertilizer (The Atlantic).White House officials reel back controls on a pesticide that may threaten essential pollinators like bees (The Guardian).Zoologists describe two new species of lizards from India (The Natural History Museum, London).New EU law holds promise for indigenous community rights around the world (Underrepresented Nations & Peoples Organization).A board member of the UN’s Green Climate Fund explains the turmoil surrounding a recent meeting, leading to a failure to approve around $1 billion in projects (Devex).Banner image of an Indian star tortoise by Davidvraju (CC BY-SA 4.0), via Wikimedia Commons.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Conservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update last_img read more

Ecuador’s indigenous Cofán hail court-ordered end to mining on their land

first_imgA court in Ecuador’s Sucumbíos province has ordered that the mining concessions already in operation on territory claimed by the Cofán indigenous people, and those currently in the process of being granted, must be canceled, affecting some 324 square kilometers (125 square miles) in total.The ruling also requires that reparations be made for any impacts caused by recent mining.For the community, the court’s decision is a victory that represents a milestone for the rights of all indigenous communities in Ecuador. In January 2018, the Cofán indigenous people of Sinangoe, Ecuador, discovered several machines mining the Aguarico riverbed near Cayambe Coca National Park. This came as a surprise to them because they’d never been consulted about any mining projects in their territory. They decided to speak out against the violation of their rights to prior consultation as well as the rights of nature and a healthy environment, which are both recognized in the Ecuadoran constitution.After nearly a year of legal struggle to halt the mining and the water pollution that came with it, the provincial court of Sucumbíos ordered that the concessions already in operation and those currently in the process of being granted must be canceled, affecting some 324 square kilometers (125 square miles) in total. With the court’s ruling, mining will not be allowed in any of those areas. Additionally, the decision requires the reparation and/or remediation of the areas already affected by mining. Before any new concession is granted, miners must begin the prior consultation process with the Cofán de Sinangoe community.When members of the Cofán community learned of the verdict in October 2018, they were overjoyed. “Sinangoe is fighting for the well-being of everyone, not only for the A’i Cofán community, but for everyone in Sucumbíos province: for the A’i Cofán, Siona, Secoya, Kichwa, and for other nationalities that are uniting to defend their rivers,” said Mario Criollo, the president of the Cofán community of Sinangoe. “This victory is a great achievement for our children and for future generations. We will continue to watch over our land and fight to have our property titles.”The Cofán community of Sinangoe spent months protesting state entities that granted mining concessions in their territory without the community’s permission. Image by Jerónimo Zuñiga for Amazon Frontlines.Not only was the violation of their right to prior consultation recognized, the court also reaffirmed their rights to water, a healthy environment, and the right of nature. “These themes were included in the community’s initial complaint, but they were not recognized in the court’s first decision,” said María Espinosa, coordinator of the Amazon Frontlines legal program and a lawyer for the Cofán de Sinangoe. “We are pleasantly surprised that this judge has done such an extensive analysis of rights. [This decision] extends its analysis to indicate that other communities and groups are equally affected.”This victory, in Criollo’s words, sets an important standard for the Cofán community and for all the indigenous communities in Ecuador defending their territories from mining. Also in October, Ecuador’s National Water Secretariat (SENAGUA) recognized the Cofánes, Chingual and Aguarico rivers as protected waters, a move that reinforces the court’s decision and represents a step forward in the application of the rights of nature.A nearly year-long legal battleFollowing the discovery of mining activities, the Cofán community requested a protective action with the help of the Ombudsman’s office to halt the mining. In an article published by Mongabay Latam in September 2018,  Nicolas Mainville, the coordinator of the environmental monitoring program at Amazon Frontlines, described how the mining was affecting the area. “In [the Puerto Libre concession], 37 acres [15 hectares] of trees were cut down, over one mile [1.6 kilometers] of road was constructed, and seven different sites were added that included pools and camps,” he said.According to Mainville the levels of pollution in the Aguarico River were not being measured, so it is unknown how much cyanide was used in the mining operations. Members of the Cofán community had requested these measurements many times, arguing that they could see a change in the water color.The Aguarico River has been contaminated by mining activity. Image by Jerónimo Zuñiga for Amazon Frontlines.Halfway through the year, they received good news: in a historic decision on July 27, a judge from the canton of Gonzalo Pizarro, an administrative division in Sucumbíos province, ruled in favor of the Cofán community and the Ombudsman’s office. The judge declared that the community’s right to free and informed prior consultation had been violated, ruling against the Ministry of Mining, the Ministry of Environment, the Mining Regulation and Control Agency (ARCOM), and SENAGUA. The court ordered the immediate suspension of all 20 mining concessions that had already been granted, along with the 32 concessions that were still being processed. This decision affirmed the communities’ claims regarding their right to prior consultation, but not to water, a healthy environment or the rights of nature.However, the decision was immediately appealed by the defendants. At the appeal hearing on Sept. 5, the institutions named as defendants in the case claimed that it had not been necessary to do the prior consultation process because, they said, the mining activity did not take place within Cofán territory, nor did it affect the interests or rights of those in the community.  “There is a clear lack of knowledge and an act of bad faith on the part of the ministries,” Espinosa said at the time.In the midst of these tensions, the three judges hearing the appeal decided to postpone their verdict until after they visited the area to observe the damages and analyze the arguments given by the parties. Uncertainty and anxiety in the Cofán community grew until Oct. 22, when the judges issued the historic ruling in their favor.The Cofán have expressed concern that the Aguarico River’s crystal-clear water may be contaminated with cyanide. Image by Jerónimo Zuñiga for Amazon Frontlines.Consultation or notification?Espinosa spoke to Mongabay Latam about the importance of this case. “This [ruling] confirms that their right to prior consultation was violated. It recognizes that they are the ancestral owners of that land and that decisions affecting them can’t be made without consulting them or knowing their opinions, especially for mining activity,” she said.However, Espinosa pointed out that even if the Cofán community was to be consulted before future mining concessions were granted, there were no guarantees the community’s position would be adhered to since there are no laws in Ecuador regulating the prior consultation process.“The guideline applied by the government for the consultation turns it into a process of simply notifying and informing the communities, but it doesn’t take into account their opinions,” Espinosa said. “Therefore, until a law exists that is created by consulting and agreeing with members of the community, they will not accept nor yield to any consultation processes.”Banner image caption: Members of the Cofán community of Sinangoe walk along the Aguarico River as a backhoe removes land in the background. Image by Jerónimo Zuñiga for Amazon Frontlines.This story first appeared on Mongabay Latam on October 25, 2018. Article published by Willie Shubert Conservation, Forests, Freshwater Fish, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Illegal Mining, Indigenous Peoples, Law Enforcement, Water Pollution center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more